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Menstrual cycle effects on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval following a psychosocial stressor.
Horm Behav. 2015 Aug; 74:201-8.HB

Abstract

This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Laboratory-induced stress produces elevations in cortisol and deficits in memory, especially when stress is induced immediately before retrieval of emotionally valent stimuli. Sex and sex steroids appear to influence these stress-induced outcomes, though no study has directly compared the effects of laboratory-induced stress on cortisol and emotional retrieval across the menstrual cycle. We examined the effect of psychosocial stress on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval in women tested during either the follicular phase (low estradiol and progesterone) or the luteal phase (higher estradiol and progesterone). Forty women (50% White; age 18-40 years) participated in the study; 20 completed the task during the luteal phase and 20 during the follicular phase. Psychosocial stress was induced with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). On the day before the TSST, participants learned two lists of word pairs to 100% criterion. The next day, participants recalled one list after the control condition and the other after the TSST. Women in the follicular phase, but not the luteal phase, demonstrated a significant cortisol response to the TSST. There was a stress-induced decrease in emotional retrieval following the TSST, but this effect was not modified by menstrual phase. However, regression and correlational analyses showed that individual differences in stress-induced cortisol levels were associated with impaired emotional retrieval in the follicular phase only. The present findings indicate that cortisol responsivity and the impairing effects of cortisol on emotional memory are lower when levels of estradiol and progesterone are high compared to when levels are low.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, 1007 West Harrison Street (M/C 285), Chicago, IL 60607-7137, USA; Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, College of Health Professions, Clinical Psychology, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064-3095, USA. Electronic address: pmaki@psych.uic.edu.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address: k_mordecai@hotmail.com.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, 1007 West Harrison Street (M/C 285), Chicago, IL 60607-7137, USA. Electronic address: lrubin@psych.uic.edu.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, 1007 West Harrison Street (M/C 285), Chicago, IL 60607-7137, USA. Electronic address: erin.sundermann@einstein.yu.edu.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA; University of Illinois at Chicago, Graduate Program in Neuroscience, 828S. Wolcott Ave., Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address: asavarese@psych.uic.edu.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, 912 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address: erin.m.eatough@gmail.com.University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, 1007 West Harrison Street (M/C 285), Chicago, IL 60607-7137, USA. Electronic address: ldrogos@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26187711

Citation

Maki, Pauline M., et al. "Menstrual Cycle Effects On Cortisol Responsivity and Emotional Retrieval Following a Psychosocial Stressor." Hormones and Behavior, vol. 74, 2015, pp. 201-8.
Maki PM, Mordecai KL, Rubin LH, et al. Menstrual cycle effects on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval following a psychosocial stressor. Horm Behav. 2015;74:201-8.
Maki, P. M., Mordecai, K. L., Rubin, L. H., Sundermann, E., Savarese, A., Eatough, E., & Drogos, L. (2015). Menstrual cycle effects on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval following a psychosocial stressor. Hormones and Behavior, 74, 201-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.06.023
Maki PM, et al. Menstrual Cycle Effects On Cortisol Responsivity and Emotional Retrieval Following a Psychosocial Stressor. Horm Behav. 2015;74:201-8. PubMed PMID: 26187711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Menstrual cycle effects on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval following a psychosocial stressor. AU - Maki,Pauline M, AU - Mordecai,Kristen L, AU - Rubin,Leah H, AU - Sundermann,Erin, AU - Savarese,Antonia, AU - Eatough,Erin, AU - Drogos,Lauren, Y1 - 2015/07/14/ PY - 2015/02/16/received PY - 2015/05/27/revised PY - 2015/06/23/accepted PY - 2015/7/19/entrez PY - 2015/7/19/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Cognition KW - Cortisol KW - Emotion KW - Estradiol KW - Memory KW - Stress SP - 201 EP - 8 JF - Hormones and behavior JO - Horm Behav VL - 74 N2 - This article is part of a Special Issue "Estradiol and cognition". Laboratory-induced stress produces elevations in cortisol and deficits in memory, especially when stress is induced immediately before retrieval of emotionally valent stimuli. Sex and sex steroids appear to influence these stress-induced outcomes, though no study has directly compared the effects of laboratory-induced stress on cortisol and emotional retrieval across the menstrual cycle. We examined the effect of psychosocial stress on cortisol responsivity and emotional retrieval in women tested during either the follicular phase (low estradiol and progesterone) or the luteal phase (higher estradiol and progesterone). Forty women (50% White; age 18-40 years) participated in the study; 20 completed the task during the luteal phase and 20 during the follicular phase. Psychosocial stress was induced with the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). On the day before the TSST, participants learned two lists of word pairs to 100% criterion. The next day, participants recalled one list after the control condition and the other after the TSST. Women in the follicular phase, but not the luteal phase, demonstrated a significant cortisol response to the TSST. There was a stress-induced decrease in emotional retrieval following the TSST, but this effect was not modified by menstrual phase. However, regression and correlational analyses showed that individual differences in stress-induced cortisol levels were associated with impaired emotional retrieval in the follicular phase only. The present findings indicate that cortisol responsivity and the impairing effects of cortisol on emotional memory are lower when levels of estradiol and progesterone are high compared to when levels are low. SN - 1095-6867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26187711/Menstrual_cycle_effects_on_cortisol_responsivity_and_emotional_retrieval_following_a_psychosocial_stressor_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0018-506X(15)30002-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -