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Overall and central adiposity and breast cancer risk in the Sister Study.
Cancer 2015; 121(20):3700-8C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Greater body mass index (BMI), a measure of overall adiposity, is associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The role of central adiposity, often measured by waist circumference, is less well understood, especially among premenopausal women. The objective of the current study was to examine multiple measures of adiposity in relation to breast cancer in a prospective cohort study.

METHODS

A total of 50,884 Sister Study cohort participants aged 35 to 74 years were enrolled from 2003 through 2009. Inclusion criteria for the cohort included having a sister previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Trained study personnel measured height, weight, and waist and hip circumference during a home visit and study participants completed a detailed questionnaire. Using Cox regression analysis, we estimated multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for breast cancer risk associated with adiposity measurements, considering tumor subtype and menopausal status.

RESULTS

In total, 2009 breast cancers were diagnosed during follow-up (mean = 5.4 years). Weight, BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio were found to be positively associated with overall breast cancer risk and HRs were greater among postmenopausal women, those with hormonally responsive tumors, and women who were not currently using postmenopausal hormones. In models that adjusted for BMI, waist circumference associations persisted among both postmenopausal women (81-88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.16 [95% CI 1.01-1.35] and >88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.30 [95% CI 1.10-1.54]) and premenopausal women (81-88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.56 [95% CI 1.19-2.04] and >88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.30 [95% CI 0.91-1.87]).

CONCLUSIONS

Findings from this large, prospective study with examiner-measured body size indicate that waist circumference is independently and positively associated with both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26193782

Citation

White, Alexandra J., et al. "Overall and Central Adiposity and Breast Cancer Risk in the Sister Study." Cancer, vol. 121, no. 20, 2015, pp. 3700-8.
White AJ, Nichols HB, Bradshaw PT, et al. Overall and central adiposity and breast cancer risk in the Sister Study. Cancer. 2015;121(20):3700-8.
White, A. J., Nichols, H. B., Bradshaw, P. T., & Sandler, D. P. (2015). Overall and central adiposity and breast cancer risk in the Sister Study. Cancer, 121(20), pp. 3700-8. doi:10.1002/cncr.29552.
White AJ, et al. Overall and Central Adiposity and Breast Cancer Risk in the Sister Study. Cancer. 2015 Oct 15;121(20):3700-8. PubMed PMID: 26193782.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overall and central adiposity and breast cancer risk in the Sister Study. AU - White,Alexandra J, AU - Nichols,Hazel B, AU - Bradshaw,Patrick T, AU - Sandler,Dale P, Y1 - 2015/07/20/ PY - 2015/02/16/received PY - 2015/05/29/revised PY - 2015/06/12/accepted PY - 2015/7/22/entrez PY - 2015/7/22/pubmed PY - 2016/1/7/medline KW - adiposity KW - body mass index KW - breast neoplasms KW - waist circumference SP - 3700 EP - 8 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 121 IS - 20 N2 - BACKGROUND: Greater body mass index (BMI), a measure of overall adiposity, is associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. The role of central adiposity, often measured by waist circumference, is less well understood, especially among premenopausal women. The objective of the current study was to examine multiple measures of adiposity in relation to breast cancer in a prospective cohort study. METHODS: A total of 50,884 Sister Study cohort participants aged 35 to 74 years were enrolled from 2003 through 2009. Inclusion criteria for the cohort included having a sister previously diagnosed with breast cancer. Trained study personnel measured height, weight, and waist and hip circumference during a home visit and study participants completed a detailed questionnaire. Using Cox regression analysis, we estimated multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for breast cancer risk associated with adiposity measurements, considering tumor subtype and menopausal status. RESULTS: In total, 2009 breast cancers were diagnosed during follow-up (mean = 5.4 years). Weight, BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio were found to be positively associated with overall breast cancer risk and HRs were greater among postmenopausal women, those with hormonally responsive tumors, and women who were not currently using postmenopausal hormones. In models that adjusted for BMI, waist circumference associations persisted among both postmenopausal women (81-88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.16 [95% CI 1.01-1.35] and >88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.30 [95% CI 1.10-1.54]) and premenopausal women (81-88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.56 [95% CI 1.19-2.04] and >88 cm vs ≤80 cm: HR = 1.30 [95% CI 0.91-1.87]). CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this large, prospective study with examiner-measured body size indicate that waist circumference is independently and positively associated with both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. SN - 1097-0142 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26193782/Overall_and_central_adiposity_and_breast_cancer_risk_in_the_Sister_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.29552 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -