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Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of gallstone disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2015; 42(6):637-48AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Epidemiologic evidence on coffee consumption reducing the risk of gallstone disease has been contradictory.

AIM

To perform a meta-analysis of observational studies, to investigate an association and dose-response of coffee consumption with gallstone disease.

METHODS

We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all published studies before June 2015. A random-effects model was used to compute a pooled relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

One case-control study and five prospective cohort studies (with seven cohorts) involving 227,749 participants and 11,477 gallstone disease cases were included. Coffee consumption was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gallstone disease (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.89; I(2) = 35.9%), based on prospective studies; specifically, we observed an inverse relation in females, but not in males. The case-control study did not reveal any association between coffee and gallstone disease (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.53). In a dose-response analysis, the RR of gallstone disease was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.91 to 1.00; P = 0.049) per 1 cup/day of coffee consumption. A significant nonlinear dose-response association was also identified (P for nonlinearity = 0.0106). For people who drank 2, 4 and 6 cups of coffee per day, the estimated RRs of gallstone disease were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.99), 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.92) and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.88), respectively, compared with the lowest level drinkers.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests that coffee consumption is related to a significantly decreased risk of gallstone disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.Institute of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26198295

Citation

Zhang, Y-P, et al. "Systematic Review With Meta-analysis: Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 42, no. 6, 2015, pp. 637-48.
Zhang YP, Li WQ, Sun YL, et al. Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of gallstone disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015;42(6):637-48.
Zhang, Y. P., Li, W. Q., Sun, Y. L., Zhu, R. T., & Wang, W. J. (2015). Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of gallstone disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 42(6), pp. 637-48. doi:10.1111/apt.13328.
Zhang YP, et al. Systematic Review With Meta-analysis: Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015;42(6):637-48. PubMed PMID: 26198295.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of gallstone disease. AU - Zhang,Y-P, AU - Li,W-Q, AU - Sun,Y-L, AU - Zhu,R-T, AU - Wang,W-J, Y1 - 2015/07/22/ PY - 2015/05/07/received PY - 2015/05/25/revised PY - 2015/07/01/revised PY - 2015/07/01/accepted PY - 2015/7/23/entrez PY - 2015/7/23/pubmed PY - 2016/3/5/medline SP - 637 EP - 48 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 42 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence on coffee consumption reducing the risk of gallstone disease has been contradictory. AIM: To perform a meta-analysis of observational studies, to investigate an association and dose-response of coffee consumption with gallstone disease. METHODS: We used PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify all published studies before June 2015. A random-effects model was used to compute a pooled relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: One case-control study and five prospective cohort studies (with seven cohorts) involving 227,749 participants and 11,477 gallstone disease cases were included. Coffee consumption was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gallstone disease (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.89; I(2) = 35.9%), based on prospective studies; specifically, we observed an inverse relation in females, but not in males. The case-control study did not reveal any association between coffee and gallstone disease (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.53). In a dose-response analysis, the RR of gallstone disease was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.91 to 1.00; P = 0.049) per 1 cup/day of coffee consumption. A significant nonlinear dose-response association was also identified (P for nonlinearity = 0.0106). For people who drank 2, 4 and 6 cups of coffee per day, the estimated RRs of gallstone disease were 0.89 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.99), 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.92) and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.88), respectively, compared with the lowest level drinkers. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that coffee consumption is related to a significantly decreased risk of gallstone disease. SN - 1365-2036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26198295/Systematic_review_with_meta_analysis:_coffee_consumption_and_the_risk_of_gallstone_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/apt.13328 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -