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Choral singing therapy following stroke or Parkinson's disease: an exploration of participants' experiences.

Abstract

PURPOSE

People with stroke or Parkinson's disease (PD) live with reduced mood, social participation and quality of life (QOL). Communication difficulties affect 90% of people with PD (dysarthria) and over 33% of people with stroke (aphasia). These consequences are disabling in many ways. However, as singing is typically still possible, its therapeutic use is of increasing interest. This article explores the experiences of and factors influencing participation in choral singing therapy (CST) by people with stroke or PD and their significant others.

METHOD

Participants (eight people with stroke, six with PD) were recruited from a community music therapy choir running CST. Significant others (seven for stroke, two for PD) were also recruited. Supported communication methods were used as needed to undertake semi-structured interviews (total N = 23).

RESULTS

Thematic analysis indicated participants had many unmet needs associated with their condition, which motivated them to explore self-management options. CST participation was described as an enjoyable social activity, and participation was perceived as improving mood, language, breathing and voice.

CONCLUSIONS

Choral singing was perceived by people with stroke and PD to help them self-manage some of the consequences of their condition, including social isolation, low mood and communication difficulties.

IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION

Choral singing therapy (CST) is sought out by people with stroke and PD to help self-manage symptoms of their condition. Participation is perceived as an enjoyable activity which improves mood, voice and language symptoms. CST may enable access to specialist music therapy and speech language therapy protocols within community frameworks.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    a Science Communication Unit, University of the West of England , Bristol , UK . b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand .

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand .

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand .

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand . c Department of Speech Science , School of Psychology, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand , and.

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand . c Department of Speech Science , School of Psychology, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand , and.

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand .

    ,

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand . c Department of Speech Science , School of Psychology, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand , and.

    ,

    d Person Centred Research Centre, AUT University , Auckland , New Zealand.

    b Centre for Brain Research, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand . c Department of Speech Science , School of Psychology, The University of Auckland , Auckland , New Zealand , and.

    Source

    Disability and rehabilitation 38:10 2016 pg 952-62

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aphasia
    Dysarthria
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Music Therapy
    Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
    Parkinson Disease
    Personal Satisfaction
    Qualitative Research
    Quality of Life
    Self Care
    Singing
    Stroke
    Stroke Rehabilitation
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26200449

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Choral singing therapy following stroke or Parkinson's disease: an exploration of participants' experiences. AU - Fogg-Rogers,Laura, AU - Buetow,Stephen, AU - Talmage,Alison, AU - McCann,Clare M, AU - Leão,Sylvia H S, AU - Tippett,Lynette, AU - Leung,Joan, AU - McPherson,Kathryn M, AU - Purdy,Suzanne C, Y1 - 2015/07/22/ PY - 2015/7/23/entrez PY - 2015/7/23/pubmed PY - 2017/2/14/medline KW - Aphasia KW - Choir KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - dysarthria KW - self-management KW - stroke SP - 952 EP - 62 JF - Disability and rehabilitation JO - Disabil Rehabil VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: People with stroke or Parkinson's disease (PD) live with reduced mood, social participation and quality of life (QOL). Communication difficulties affect 90% of people with PD (dysarthria) and over 33% of people with stroke (aphasia). These consequences are disabling in many ways. However, as singing is typically still possible, its therapeutic use is of increasing interest. This article explores the experiences of and factors influencing participation in choral singing therapy (CST) by people with stroke or PD and their significant others. METHOD: Participants (eight people with stroke, six with PD) were recruited from a community music therapy choir running CST. Significant others (seven for stroke, two for PD) were also recruited. Supported communication methods were used as needed to undertake semi-structured interviews (total N = 23). RESULTS: Thematic analysis indicated participants had many unmet needs associated with their condition, which motivated them to explore self-management options. CST participation was described as an enjoyable social activity, and participation was perceived as improving mood, language, breathing and voice. CONCLUSIONS: Choral singing was perceived by people with stroke and PD to help them self-manage some of the consequences of their condition, including social isolation, low mood and communication difficulties. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION: Choral singing therapy (CST) is sought out by people with stroke and PD to help self-manage symptoms of their condition. Participation is perceived as an enjoyable activity which improves mood, voice and language symptoms. CST may enable access to specialist music therapy and speech language therapy protocols within community frameworks. SN - 1464-5165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26200449/Choral_singing_therapy_following_stroke_or_Parkinson's_disease:_an_exploration_of_participants'_experiences_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09638288.2015.1068875 ER -