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A comparison of plasma and prostate lycopene in response to typical servings of tomato soup, sauce or juice in men before prostatectomy.
Br J Nutr 2015; 114(4):596-607BJ

Abstract

Tomato product consumption and estimated lycopene intake are hypothesised to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. To define the impact of typical servings of commercially available tomato products on resultant plasma and prostate lycopene concentrations, men scheduled to undergo prostatectomy (n 33) were randomised either to a lycopene-restricted control group (< 5 mg lycopene/d) or to a tomato soup (2-2¾ cups prepared/d), tomato sauce (142-198 g/d or 5-7 ounces/d) or vegetable juice (325-488 ml/d or 11-16·5 fluid ounces/d) intervention providing 25-35 mg lycopene/d. Plasma and prostate carotenoid concentrations were measured by HPLC. Tomato soup, sauce and juice consumption significantly increased plasma lycopene concentration from 0·68 (sem 0·1) to 1·13 (sem 0·09) μmol/l (66 %), 0·48 (sem 0·09) to 0·82 (sem 0·12) μmol/l (71 %) and 0·49 (sem 0·12) to 0·78 (sem 0·1) μmol/l (59 %), respectively, while the controls consuming the lycopene-restricted diet showed a decline in plasma lycopene concentration from 0·55 (sem 0·60) to 0·42 (sem 0·07) μmol/l (- 24 %). The end-of-study prostate lycopene concentration was 0·16 (sem 0·02) nmol/g in the controls, but was 3·5-, 3·6- and 2·2-fold higher in tomato soup (P= 0·001), sauce (P= 0·001) and juice (P= 0·165) consumers, respectively. Prostate lycopene concentration was moderately correlated with post-intervention plasma lycopene concentrations (r 0·60, P =0·001), indicating that additional factors have an impact on tissue concentrations. While the primary geometric lycopene isomer in tomato products was all-trans (80-90 %), plasma and prostate isomers were 47 and 80 % cis, respectively, demonstrating a shift towards cis accumulation. Consumption of typical servings of processed tomato products results in differing plasma and prostate lycopene concentrations. Factors including meal composition and genetics deserve further evaluation to determine their impacts on lycopene absorption and biodistribution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,A456 Starling Loving Hall, 320 West 10th Avenue,Columbus,OH43210,USA.Department of Food Science and Technology,College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Sciences, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.Department of Urology,College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.Department of Urology,College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,Columbus,OH43210,USA.Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University,A456 Starling Loving Hall, 320 West 10th Avenue,Columbus,OH43210,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26202168

Citation

Grainger, Elizabeth M., et al. "A Comparison of Plasma and Prostate Lycopene in Response to Typical Servings of Tomato Soup, Sauce or Juice in Men Before Prostatectomy." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 114, no. 4, 2015, pp. 596-607.
Grainger EM, Hadley CW, Moran NE, et al. A comparison of plasma and prostate lycopene in response to typical servings of tomato soup, sauce or juice in men before prostatectomy. Br J Nutr. 2015;114(4):596-607.
Grainger, E. M., Hadley, C. W., Moran, N. E., Riedl, K. M., Gong, M. C., Pohar, K., ... Clinton, S. K. (2015). A comparison of plasma and prostate lycopene in response to typical servings of tomato soup, sauce or juice in men before prostatectomy. The British Journal of Nutrition, 114(4), pp. 596-607. doi:10.1017/S0007114515002202.
Grainger EM, et al. A Comparison of Plasma and Prostate Lycopene in Response to Typical Servings of Tomato Soup, Sauce or Juice in Men Before Prostatectomy. Br J Nutr. 2015 Aug 28;114(4):596-607. PubMed PMID: 26202168.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A comparison of plasma and prostate lycopene in response to typical servings of tomato soup, sauce or juice in men before prostatectomy. AU - Grainger,Elizabeth M, AU - Hadley,Craig W, AU - Moran,Nancy E, AU - Riedl,Kenneth M, AU - Gong,Michael C, AU - Pohar,Kamal, AU - Schwartz,Steven J, AU - Clinton,Steven K, Y1 - 2015/07/23/ PY - 2015/7/24/entrez PY - 2015/7/24/pubmed PY - 2015/11/10/medline KW - Lycopene KW - Lycopene isomers KW - Prostate cancer KW - Prostatectomy KW - Tomatoes SP - 596 EP - 607 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 114 IS - 4 N2 - Tomato product consumption and estimated lycopene intake are hypothesised to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. To define the impact of typical servings of commercially available tomato products on resultant plasma and prostate lycopene concentrations, men scheduled to undergo prostatectomy (n 33) were randomised either to a lycopene-restricted control group (< 5 mg lycopene/d) or to a tomato soup (2-2¾ cups prepared/d), tomato sauce (142-198 g/d or 5-7 ounces/d) or vegetable juice (325-488 ml/d or 11-16·5 fluid ounces/d) intervention providing 25-35 mg lycopene/d. Plasma and prostate carotenoid concentrations were measured by HPLC. Tomato soup, sauce and juice consumption significantly increased plasma lycopene concentration from 0·68 (sem 0·1) to 1·13 (sem 0·09) μmol/l (66 %), 0·48 (sem 0·09) to 0·82 (sem 0·12) μmol/l (71 %) and 0·49 (sem 0·12) to 0·78 (sem 0·1) μmol/l (59 %), respectively, while the controls consuming the lycopene-restricted diet showed a decline in plasma lycopene concentration from 0·55 (sem 0·60) to 0·42 (sem 0·07) μmol/l (- 24 %). The end-of-study prostate lycopene concentration was 0·16 (sem 0·02) nmol/g in the controls, but was 3·5-, 3·6- and 2·2-fold higher in tomato soup (P= 0·001), sauce (P= 0·001) and juice (P= 0·165) consumers, respectively. Prostate lycopene concentration was moderately correlated with post-intervention plasma lycopene concentrations (r 0·60, P =0·001), indicating that additional factors have an impact on tissue concentrations. While the primary geometric lycopene isomer in tomato products was all-trans (80-90 %), plasma and prostate isomers were 47 and 80 % cis, respectively, demonstrating a shift towards cis accumulation. Consumption of typical servings of processed tomato products results in differing plasma and prostate lycopene concentrations. Factors including meal composition and genetics deserve further evaluation to determine their impacts on lycopene absorption and biodistribution. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26202168/A_comparison_of_plasma_and_prostate_lycopene_in_response_to_typical_servings_of_tomato_soup_sauce_or_juice_in_men_before_prostatectomy_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114515002202/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -