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Firearm ownership in veterans entering residential PTSD treatment: Associations with suicide ideation, attempts, and combat exposure.
Psychiatry Res. 2015 Sep 30; 229(1-2):220-4.PR

Abstract

This study aimed to describe the frequency of firearm ownership in veterans entering residential treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examine the association of firearm ownership with suicide ideation and suicide attempt history, combat exposure, and PTSD symptom severity. Two samples of veterans entering residential PTSD treatment were assessed at intake using self-report measures. Approximately one third of participants endorsed firearm ownership across the two samples. Analyses with a sample predominantly comprised of Vietnam Veterans found that those who endorsed both suicide ideation and prior suicide attempts were less likely to own a firearm compared to suicide ideators and non-suicidal participants. In addition, more frequent combat exposure, but not PTSD symptom severity, was associated with firearm ownership in both samples and most participants endorsed using safe storage practices. These lower rates of firearm ownership generally, and in those with suicide ideation and prior attempts in particular, may reflect an increased focused on means restriction in treatment for combat-related PTSD. Means restriction counseling among PTSD treatment seeking veterans should target those with combat exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA. Electronic address: pnsmith@southalabama.edu.Department of Psychology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA.National Center for PTSD, VA Palo Alto Healthcare System, Menlo Park, CA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26208987

Citation

Smith, Phillip N., et al. "Firearm Ownership in Veterans Entering Residential PTSD Treatment: Associations With Suicide Ideation, Attempts, and Combat Exposure." Psychiatry Research, vol. 229, no. 1-2, 2015, pp. 220-4.
Smith PN, Currier J, Drescher K. Firearm ownership in veterans entering residential PTSD treatment: Associations with suicide ideation, attempts, and combat exposure. Psychiatry Res. 2015;229(1-2):220-4.
Smith, P. N., Currier, J., & Drescher, K. (2015). Firearm ownership in veterans entering residential PTSD treatment: Associations with suicide ideation, attempts, and combat exposure. Psychiatry Research, 229(1-2), 220-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2015.07.031
Smith PN, Currier J, Drescher K. Firearm Ownership in Veterans Entering Residential PTSD Treatment: Associations With Suicide Ideation, Attempts, and Combat Exposure. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Sep 30;229(1-2):220-4. PubMed PMID: 26208987.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Firearm ownership in veterans entering residential PTSD treatment: Associations with suicide ideation, attempts, and combat exposure. AU - Smith,Phillip N, AU - Currier,Joseph, AU - Drescher,Kent, Y1 - 2015/07/15/ PY - 2015/01/30/received PY - 2015/05/02/revised PY - 2015/07/12/accepted PY - 2015/7/26/entrez PY - 2015/7/26/pubmed PY - 2016/4/7/medline KW - Combat exposure KW - Firearm ownership KW - Posttraumatic stress disorder KW - Suicide attempts KW - Suicide ideation KW - Veterans SP - 220 EP - 4 JF - Psychiatry research JO - Psychiatry Res VL - 229 IS - 1-2 N2 - This study aimed to describe the frequency of firearm ownership in veterans entering residential treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examine the association of firearm ownership with suicide ideation and suicide attempt history, combat exposure, and PTSD symptom severity. Two samples of veterans entering residential PTSD treatment were assessed at intake using self-report measures. Approximately one third of participants endorsed firearm ownership across the two samples. Analyses with a sample predominantly comprised of Vietnam Veterans found that those who endorsed both suicide ideation and prior suicide attempts were less likely to own a firearm compared to suicide ideators and non-suicidal participants. In addition, more frequent combat exposure, but not PTSD symptom severity, was associated with firearm ownership in both samples and most participants endorsed using safe storage practices. These lower rates of firearm ownership generally, and in those with suicide ideation and prior attempts in particular, may reflect an increased focused on means restriction in treatment for combat-related PTSD. Means restriction counseling among PTSD treatment seeking veterans should target those with combat exposure. SN - 1872-7123 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26208987/Firearm_ownership_in_veterans_entering_residential_PTSD_treatment:_Associations_with_suicide_ideation_attempts_and_combat_exposure_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-1781(15)00488-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -