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Safety monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).
Vaccine. 2015 Aug 26; 33(36):4398-405.V

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conduct post-licensure vaccine safety monitoring using the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous (or passive) reporting system. This means that after a vaccine is approved, CDC and FDA continue to monitor safety while it is distributed in the marketplace for use by collecting and analyzing spontaneous reports of adverse events that occur in persons following vaccination. Various methods and statistical techniques are used to analyze VAERS data, which CDC and FDA use to guide further safety evaluations and inform decisions around vaccine recommendations and regulatory action. VAERS data must be interpreted with caution due to the inherent limitations of passive surveillance. VAERS is primarily a safety signal detection and hypothesis generating system. Generally, VAERS data cannot be used to determine if a vaccine caused an adverse event. VAERS data interpreted alone or out of context can lead to erroneous conclusions about cause and effect as well as the risk of adverse events occurring following vaccination. CDC makes VAERS data available to the public and readily accessible online. We describe fundamental vaccine safety concepts, provide an overview of VAERS for healthcare professionals who provide vaccinations and might want to report or better understand a vaccine adverse event, and explain how CDC and FDA analyze VAERS data. We also describe strengths and limitations, and address common misconceptions about VAERS. Information in this review will be helpful for healthcare professionals counseling patients, parents, and others on vaccine safety and benefit-risk balance of vaccination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunization Safety Office, Division of Health care Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States. Electronic address: TShimabukuro@cdc.gov.Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, United States.Office of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, United States.Immunization Safety Office, Division of Health care Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26209838

Citation

Shimabukuro, Tom T., et al. "Safety Monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)." Vaccine, vol. 33, no. 36, 2015, pp. 4398-405.
Shimabukuro TT, Nguyen M, Martin D, et al. Safety monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Vaccine. 2015;33(36):4398-405.
Shimabukuro, T. T., Nguyen, M., Martin, D., & DeStefano, F. (2015). Safety monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Vaccine, 33(36), 4398-405. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.07.035
Shimabukuro TT, et al. Safety Monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Vaccine. 2015 Aug 26;33(36):4398-405. PubMed PMID: 26209838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Safety monitoring in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). AU - Shimabukuro,Tom T, AU - Nguyen,Michael, AU - Martin,David, AU - DeStefano,Frank, Y1 - 2015/07/22/ PY - 2014/12/26/received PY - 2015/07/09/revised PY - 2015/07/11/accepted PY - 2015/7/26/entrez PY - 2015/7/26/pubmed PY - 2016/5/18/medline KW - Adverse effect KW - Adverse event following immunization KW - Adverse reaction KW - Passive surveillance KW - Spontaneous reporting KW - Vaccination KW - Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) KW - Vaccine adverse event KW - Vaccine safety SP - 4398 EP - 405 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 33 IS - 36 N2 - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conduct post-licensure vaccine safety monitoring using the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), a spontaneous (or passive) reporting system. This means that after a vaccine is approved, CDC and FDA continue to monitor safety while it is distributed in the marketplace for use by collecting and analyzing spontaneous reports of adverse events that occur in persons following vaccination. Various methods and statistical techniques are used to analyze VAERS data, which CDC and FDA use to guide further safety evaluations and inform decisions around vaccine recommendations and regulatory action. VAERS data must be interpreted with caution due to the inherent limitations of passive surveillance. VAERS is primarily a safety signal detection and hypothesis generating system. Generally, VAERS data cannot be used to determine if a vaccine caused an adverse event. VAERS data interpreted alone or out of context can lead to erroneous conclusions about cause and effect as well as the risk of adverse events occurring following vaccination. CDC makes VAERS data available to the public and readily accessible online. We describe fundamental vaccine safety concepts, provide an overview of VAERS for healthcare professionals who provide vaccinations and might want to report or better understand a vaccine adverse event, and explain how CDC and FDA analyze VAERS data. We also describe strengths and limitations, and address common misconceptions about VAERS. Information in this review will be helpful for healthcare professionals counseling patients, parents, and others on vaccine safety and benefit-risk balance of vaccination. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26209838/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(15)00982-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -