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Predicting resting energy expenditure in young adults.
Obes Res Clin Pract. 2016 May-Jun; 10(3):304-14.OR

Abstract

PURPOSE

To develop and validate a REE prediction equation for young adults.

METHODS

Baseline data from two studies were pooled (N=318; women=52%) and randomly divided into development (n=159) and validation samples (n=159). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Stepwise regression was used to develop an equation to predict REE (University of Kansas (KU) equation). The KU equation and 5 additional REE prediction equations used in clinical practice (Mifflin-St. Jeor, Harris-Benedict, Owens, Frankenfield (2 equations)) were evaluated in the validation sample.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences between predicted and measured REE using the KU equation for either men or women. The Mifflin-St. Jeor equation showed a non-significant mean bias in men; however, mean bias was statistically significant in women. The Harris-Benedict equation significantly over-predicted REE in both men and women. The Owens equation showed a significant mean bias in both men and women. Frankenfield equations #1 and #2 both significantly over-predicted REE in non-obese men and women. We found no significant differences between measured REE and REE predicted by the Frankenfield #2 equations in obese men and women.

CONCLUSION

The KU equation, which uses easily assessed characteristics (age, sex, weight) may offer better estimates of REE in young adults compared with the 5 other equations. The KU equation demonstrated adequate prediction accuracy, with approximately equal rates of over and under-prediction. However, enthusiasm for recommending any REE prediction equations evaluated for use in clinical weight management is damped by the highly variable individual prediction error evident with all these equations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. Electronic address: ewillis@ku.edu.Center for Health Outcomes & Prevention Research, Sanford Health, Sioux Falls, SD, USA.University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26210376

Citation

Willis, Erik A., et al. "Predicting Resting Energy Expenditure in Young Adults." Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, vol. 10, no. 3, 2016, pp. 304-14.
Willis EA, Herrmann SD, Ptomey LT, et al. Predicting resting energy expenditure in young adults. Obes Res Clin Pract. 2016;10(3):304-14.
Willis, E. A., Herrmann, S. D., Ptomey, L. T., Honas, J. J., Bessmer, C. T., Donnelly, J. E., & Washburn, R. A. (2016). Predicting resting energy expenditure in young adults. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 10(3), 304-14. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2015.07.002
Willis EA, et al. Predicting Resting Energy Expenditure in Young Adults. Obes Res Clin Pract. 2016 May-Jun;10(3):304-14. PubMed PMID: 26210376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting resting energy expenditure in young adults. AU - Willis,Erik A, AU - Herrmann,Stephen D, AU - Ptomey,Lauren T, AU - Honas,Jeffery J, AU - Bessmer,Christopher T, AU - Donnelly,Joseph E, AU - Washburn,Richard A, Y1 - 2015/07/22/ PY - 2014/11/18/received PY - 2015/06/28/revised PY - 2015/07/05/accepted PY - 2015/7/27/entrez PY - 2015/7/27/pubmed PY - 2017/11/3/medline KW - Indirect calorimetry KW - Resting energy expenditure KW - Weight management KW - Young adults SP - 304 EP - 14 JF - Obesity research & clinical practice JO - Obes Res Clin Pract VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To develop and validate a REE prediction equation for young adults. METHODS: Baseline data from two studies were pooled (N=318; women=52%) and randomly divided into development (n=159) and validation samples (n=159). REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Stepwise regression was used to develop an equation to predict REE (University of Kansas (KU) equation). The KU equation and 5 additional REE prediction equations used in clinical practice (Mifflin-St. Jeor, Harris-Benedict, Owens, Frankenfield (2 equations)) were evaluated in the validation sample. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between predicted and measured REE using the KU equation for either men or women. The Mifflin-St. Jeor equation showed a non-significant mean bias in men; however, mean bias was statistically significant in women. The Harris-Benedict equation significantly over-predicted REE in both men and women. The Owens equation showed a significant mean bias in both men and women. Frankenfield equations #1 and #2 both significantly over-predicted REE in non-obese men and women. We found no significant differences between measured REE and REE predicted by the Frankenfield #2 equations in obese men and women. CONCLUSION: The KU equation, which uses easily assessed characteristics (age, sex, weight) may offer better estimates of REE in young adults compared with the 5 other equations. The KU equation demonstrated adequate prediction accuracy, with approximately equal rates of over and under-prediction. However, enthusiasm for recommending any REE prediction equations evaluated for use in clinical weight management is damped by the highly variable individual prediction error evident with all these equations. SN - 1871-403X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26210376/Predicting_resting_energy_expenditure_in_young_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1871-403X(15)00104-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -