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Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 2015; 29(5):472-9PP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Developmental status at birth and subsequent obesity have been implicated in the development of childhood atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic rhinitis (AR).

METHODS

The current study analysed the cohort data of 74 688 junior high school students from a national retrospective birth cohort study in Taiwan. A random 10% sample was selected from singleton livebirths with complete data on the analytical variables of interest. Atopic disorders, including AD and AR, were assessed by questionnaires (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood). Logistic regression analyses were applied with adjustments for related risk factors.

RESULTS

Among subjects mainly 13-15 years of age, the estimated prevalence was 7.6% for AD and 22.4% for AR. While the role of fetal growth in allergic disorders was less evident, the risk of developing AD and AR were both influenced by a combination of fetal growth status and adolescent body mass index (BMI). Compared with those with normal fetal growth and school-aged BMI, the risk of developing AD increased 64% among adolescents with both restricted fetal growth and high BMI (odds ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.37, 1.97). The risk for this combination was higher than that for either restricted fetal growth or high BMI alone. Nevertheless, the overall interaction between BMI and fetal growth status on atopic disorders did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

Excessive weight gain could be an important risk factor related to developing atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis during adolescence, especially among infants born small for gestational age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Public Health, Tzu-Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan.Department of Integrative Physiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan. Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei, Taiwan. Institute of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26218618

Citation

Lin, Meng-Hung, et al. "Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study." Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, vol. 29, no. 5, 2015, pp. 472-9.
Lin MH, Hsieh CJ, Caffrey JL, et al. Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015;29(5):472-9.
Lin, M. H., Hsieh, C. J., Caffrey, J. L., Lin, Y. S., Wang, I. J., Ho, W. C., ... Lin, R. S. (2015). Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 29(5), pp. 472-9. doi:10.1111/ppe.12215.
Lin MH, et al. Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015;29(5):472-9. PubMed PMID: 26218618.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fetal Growth, Obesity, and Atopic Disorders in Adolescence: a Retrospective Birth Cohort Study. AU - Lin,Meng-Hung, AU - Hsieh,Chia-Jung, AU - Caffrey,James L, AU - Lin,Yu-Sheng, AU - Wang,I-Jen, AU - Ho,Wen-Chao, AU - Chen,Pau-Chung, AU - Wu,Trong-Neng, AU - Lin,Ruey-Shiung, Y1 - 2015/07/28/ PY - 2015/7/29/entrez PY - 2015/7/29/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - allergic rhinitis KW - atopic dermatitis KW - body mass index KW - obesity KW - small for gestational age SP - 472 EP - 9 JF - Paediatric and perinatal epidemiology JO - Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol VL - 29 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Developmental status at birth and subsequent obesity have been implicated in the development of childhood atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic rhinitis (AR). METHODS: The current study analysed the cohort data of 74 688 junior high school students from a national retrospective birth cohort study in Taiwan. A random 10% sample was selected from singleton livebirths with complete data on the analytical variables of interest. Atopic disorders, including AD and AR, were assessed by questionnaires (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood). Logistic regression analyses were applied with adjustments for related risk factors. RESULTS: Among subjects mainly 13-15 years of age, the estimated prevalence was 7.6% for AD and 22.4% for AR. While the role of fetal growth in allergic disorders was less evident, the risk of developing AD and AR were both influenced by a combination of fetal growth status and adolescent body mass index (BMI). Compared with those with normal fetal growth and school-aged BMI, the risk of developing AD increased 64% among adolescents with both restricted fetal growth and high BMI (odds ratio 1.64, 95% confidence interval 1.37, 1.97). The risk for this combination was higher than that for either restricted fetal growth or high BMI alone. Nevertheless, the overall interaction between BMI and fetal growth status on atopic disorders did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Excessive weight gain could be an important risk factor related to developing atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis during adolescence, especially among infants born small for gestational age. SN - 1365-3016 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26218618/Fetal_Growth_Obesity_and_Atopic_Disorders_in_Adolescence:_a_Retrospective_Birth_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ppe.12215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -