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Trends in paediatric maxillofacial trauma presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012.
N Z Dent J 2015; 111(2):76-9NZ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this study was to review the epidemiology, aetiology and management of maxillofacial injuries in the paediatric population seen in Dunedin, New Zealand from 2006 to 2012.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted over a 7 year period. Data concerning demographics, injuries and management of patients between the ages of 0-17 years who presented to the oral and maxillofacial service in Dunedin were gathered and analysed.

RESULTS

340 incidents that excluded pure dental trauma were recorded. Falls were found to be the most common cause of injury; followed by contact with animate objects (other individuals and animals), contact with inanimate objects and road traffic accidents. Injuries in younger age groups were found to be caused by falls and contact with inanimate objects more often, receiving predominantly soft tissue injuries. In the older age group, a higher number of facial fractures were seen with a change in the most common causes to road traffic accidents and contact with animate objects. An increase in alcohol-related road traffic accidents was noted among females. For all injuries the male to female ratio was 2:1 which is similar to previous reports from New Zealand and overseas. For the sub group of facial fractures a much higher ratio of males were seen at a ratio of 8.5:1.

CONCLUSIONS

Causes of injury and anatomical location followed similar patterns to reports worldwide, along with a similar male to female ratio. Although the incidence of road traffic accident related facial injuries is relatively low, the high proportion of these accidents involving paediatric patients and alcohol is of concern.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26219184

Citation

Jung, T K., et al. "Trends in Paediatric Maxillofacial Trauma Presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012." The New Zealand Dental Journal, vol. 111, no. 2, 2015, pp. 76-9.
Jung TK, De Silva HL, Konthasingha PP, et al. Trends in paediatric maxillofacial trauma presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012. N Z Dent J. 2015;111(2):76-9.
Jung, T. K., De Silva, H. L., Konthasingha, P. P., & Tong, D. C. (2015). Trends in paediatric maxillofacial trauma presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012. The New Zealand Dental Journal, 111(2), pp. 76-9.
Jung TK, et al. Trends in Paediatric Maxillofacial Trauma Presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012. N Z Dent J. 2015;111(2):76-9. PubMed PMID: 26219184.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in paediatric maxillofacial trauma presenting to Dunedin Hospital, 2006 to 2012. AU - Jung,T K, AU - De Silva,H L, AU - Konthasingha,P P, AU - Tong,D C, PY - 2015/7/30/entrez PY - 2015/7/30/pubmed PY - 2015/8/14/medline SP - 76 EP - 9 JF - The New Zealand dental journal JO - N Z Dent J VL - 111 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to review the epidemiology, aetiology and management of maxillofacial injuries in the paediatric population seen in Dunedin, New Zealand from 2006 to 2012. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective descriptive analysis was conducted over a 7 year period. Data concerning demographics, injuries and management of patients between the ages of 0-17 years who presented to the oral and maxillofacial service in Dunedin were gathered and analysed. RESULTS: 340 incidents that excluded pure dental trauma were recorded. Falls were found to be the most common cause of injury; followed by contact with animate objects (other individuals and animals), contact with inanimate objects and road traffic accidents. Injuries in younger age groups were found to be caused by falls and contact with inanimate objects more often, receiving predominantly soft tissue injuries. In the older age group, a higher number of facial fractures were seen with a change in the most common causes to road traffic accidents and contact with animate objects. An increase in alcohol-related road traffic accidents was noted among females. For all injuries the male to female ratio was 2:1 which is similar to previous reports from New Zealand and overseas. For the sub group of facial fractures a much higher ratio of males were seen at a ratio of 8.5:1. CONCLUSIONS: Causes of injury and anatomical location followed similar patterns to reports worldwide, along with a similar male to female ratio. Although the incidence of road traffic accident related facial injuries is relatively low, the high proportion of these accidents involving paediatric patients and alcohol is of concern. SN - 0028-8047 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26219184/Trends_in_paediatric_maxillofacial_trauma_presenting_to_Dunedin_Hospital_2006_to_2012_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -