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Lean-seafood intake reduces cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects: results from a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep; 102(3):582-92.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observational studies have strongly indicated an association between fish consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but data from randomized controlled trials have been inconclusive.

OBJECTIVE

Our primary outcome in this study was to elucidate the potentials of the 2 main dietary protein sources lean seafood and nonseafood to modulate fasting and postprandial lipids in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that lean-seafood intake would reduce cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects more than would the intake of nonseafood protein sources.

DESIGN

This study was a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design. After 3-wk run-in periods and separated by a 5-wk washout period, 20 healthy subjects (7 men and 13 women) consumed 2 balanced diets that varied in main protein sources (60% of total dietary proteins from lean-seafood or nonseafood sources for 4 wk). At days 1 and 28 of each intervention, fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected before and after consumption, respectively, of test meals with cod or lean beef.

RESULTS

Relative to the nonseafood intervention, the lean-seafood intervention reduced fasting (relative difference by diets: 0.31 mmol/L; P = 0.03) and postprandial (P = 0.01) serum triacylglycerol concentrations. The lower serum triacylglycerol concentration was associated with reduced fasting triacylglycerol in chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) (P = 0.004), reduced fasting VLDL particle size (P = 0.04), and a reduced postprandial concentration of medium-sized VLDL particles (P = 0.02). The lean-seafood intervention prevented the elevated ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol in the fasted serum (P = 0.03) and postprandial serum (P = 0.01) that was observed after the nonseafood intervention.

CONCLUSION

The dietary protein source determines fasting and postprandial lipids in healthy individuals in a manner that may have an effect on the long-term development of cardiovascular disease. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01708681.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Faculty of Education, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway;National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway;National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway;Hormone Laboratory, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; and.School of Nutrition, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada.Faculty of Education, Bergen University College, Bergen, Norway;Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hormone Laboratory, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; and.School of Nutrition, Laval University, Quebec City, Canada.National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway; bli@nifes.no.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26224298

Citation

Aadland, Eli Kristin, et al. "Lean-seafood Intake Reduces Cardiovascular Lipid Risk Factors in Healthy Subjects: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial With a Crossover Design." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 102, no. 3, 2015, pp. 582-92.
Aadland EK, Lavigne C, Graff IE, et al. Lean-seafood intake reduces cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects: results from a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(3):582-92.
Aadland, E. K., Lavigne, C., Graff, I. E., Eng, Ø., Paquette, M., Holthe, A., Mellgren, G., Jacques, H., & Liaset, B. (2015). Lean-seafood intake reduces cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects: results from a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 102(3), 582-92. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.112086
Aadland EK, et al. Lean-seafood Intake Reduces Cardiovascular Lipid Risk Factors in Healthy Subjects: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial With a Crossover Design. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102(3):582-92. PubMed PMID: 26224298.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lean-seafood intake reduces cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects: results from a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design. AU - Aadland,Eli Kristin, AU - Lavigne,Charles, AU - Graff,Ingvild Eide, AU - Eng,Øyvin, AU - Paquette,Martine, AU - Holthe,Asle, AU - Mellgren,Gunnar, AU - Jacques,Hélène, AU - Liaset,Bjørn, Y1 - 2015/07/29/ PY - 2015/04/16/received PY - 2015/07/06/accepted PY - 2015/7/31/entrez PY - 2015/8/1/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - cardiovascular disease KW - dietary protein KW - lifestyle KW - lipoproteins KW - risk factors SP - 582 EP - 92 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 102 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observational studies have strongly indicated an association between fish consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but data from randomized controlled trials have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: Our primary outcome in this study was to elucidate the potentials of the 2 main dietary protein sources lean seafood and nonseafood to modulate fasting and postprandial lipids in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that lean-seafood intake would reduce cardiovascular lipid risk factors in healthy subjects more than would the intake of nonseafood protein sources. DESIGN: This study was a randomized controlled trial with a crossover design. After 3-wk run-in periods and separated by a 5-wk washout period, 20 healthy subjects (7 men and 13 women) consumed 2 balanced diets that varied in main protein sources (60% of total dietary proteins from lean-seafood or nonseafood sources for 4 wk). At days 1 and 28 of each intervention, fasting and postprandial blood samples were collected before and after consumption, respectively, of test meals with cod or lean beef. RESULTS: Relative to the nonseafood intervention, the lean-seafood intervention reduced fasting (relative difference by diets: 0.31 mmol/L; P = 0.03) and postprandial (P = 0.01) serum triacylglycerol concentrations. The lower serum triacylglycerol concentration was associated with reduced fasting triacylglycerol in chylomicrons and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) (P = 0.004), reduced fasting VLDL particle size (P = 0.04), and a reduced postprandial concentration of medium-sized VLDL particles (P = 0.02). The lean-seafood intervention prevented the elevated ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol in the fasted serum (P = 0.03) and postprandial serum (P = 0.01) that was observed after the nonseafood intervention. CONCLUSION: The dietary protein source determines fasting and postprandial lipids in healthy individuals in a manner that may have an effect on the long-term development of cardiovascular disease. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01708681. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26224298/Lean_seafood_intake_reduces_cardiovascular_lipid_risk_factors_in_healthy_subjects:_results_from_a_randomized_controlled_trial_with_a_crossover_design_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.112086 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -