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Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Oct; 24(10):1557-63.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence relating heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA), associated with high-temperature cooking methods, to prostate cancer risk is inconsistent.

METHODS

In a large U.S. cohort study, intakes of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and a meat-derived mutagenicity (MDM) index were assessed using a cooking method questionnaire administered in 1996. Until 2010, 2,770 prostate cancer cases were observed among 26,030 participants.

RESULTS

Intake of PhIP from red meat was statistically significantly associated with total prostate cancer risk (top vs. bottom quintile HR, 1.18; 95% confidence intervals; CI, 1.03-1.35), but not other HCAs (MeIQx, 1.12; 0.98-1.27, PhIP from white meat, 1.08; 0.95-1.22, DiMeIQx, 1.09; 0.97-1.21) or MDM (1.13; 1.00-1.28). For high-grade (Gleason sum 7 with pattern 4+3 and Gleason sum 8-10, n = 483 cases) and advanced cancers (n = 281), we only observed positive associations for PhIP from red meat (top vs. bottom quintile: high grade: HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04-1.98, Ptrend = 0.03; advanced: HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.99-2.26; Ptrend = 0.12), but associations for advanced cancers did not reach statistical significance. Observed associations remained similar after adjustment for total, unprocessed, or processed red meat intake.

CONCLUSION

Observed positive associations between PhIP intake from red meat and prostate cancer, particularly high-grade and possibly also advanced prostate cancer, need to be confirmed in other studies.

IMPACT

Results do not provide strong evidence that HCAs increase risk of prostate cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Prevention Institute (EBPI), University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@uzh.ch.Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Urology and the James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26224797

Citation

Rohrmann, Sabine, et al. "Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 24, no. 10, 2015, pp. 1557-63.
Rohrmann S, Nimptsch K, Sinha R, et al. Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(10):1557-63.
Rohrmann, S., Nimptsch, K., Sinha, R., Willett, W. C., Giovannucci, E. L., Platz, E. A., & Wu, K. (2015). Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 24(10), 1557-63. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0068-T
Rohrmann S, et al. Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(10):1557-63. PubMed PMID: 26224797.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of Meat Mutagens and Risk of Prostate Cancer in a Cohort of U.S. Health Professionals. AU - Rohrmann,Sabine, AU - Nimptsch,Katharina, AU - Sinha,Rashmi, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, AU - Wu,Kana, Y1 - 2015/07/29/ PY - 2015/01/28/received PY - 2015/06/30/accepted PY - 2015/7/31/entrez PY - 2015/8/1/pubmed PY - 2016/7/22/medline SP - 1557 EP - 63 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 24 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence relating heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCA), associated with high-temperature cooking methods, to prostate cancer risk is inconsistent. METHODS: In a large U.S. cohort study, intakes of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (DiMeIQx) and a meat-derived mutagenicity (MDM) index were assessed using a cooking method questionnaire administered in 1996. Until 2010, 2,770 prostate cancer cases were observed among 26,030 participants. RESULTS: Intake of PhIP from red meat was statistically significantly associated with total prostate cancer risk (top vs. bottom quintile HR, 1.18; 95% confidence intervals; CI, 1.03-1.35), but not other HCAs (MeIQx, 1.12; 0.98-1.27, PhIP from white meat, 1.08; 0.95-1.22, DiMeIQx, 1.09; 0.97-1.21) or MDM (1.13; 1.00-1.28). For high-grade (Gleason sum 7 with pattern 4+3 and Gleason sum 8-10, n = 483 cases) and advanced cancers (n = 281), we only observed positive associations for PhIP from red meat (top vs. bottom quintile: high grade: HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04-1.98, Ptrend = 0.03; advanced: HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 0.99-2.26; Ptrend = 0.12), but associations for advanced cancers did not reach statistical significance. Observed associations remained similar after adjustment for total, unprocessed, or processed red meat intake. CONCLUSION: Observed positive associations between PhIP intake from red meat and prostate cancer, particularly high-grade and possibly also advanced prostate cancer, need to be confirmed in other studies. IMPACT: Results do not provide strong evidence that HCAs increase risk of prostate cancers. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26224797/Intake_of_Meat_Mutagens_and_Risk_of_Prostate_Cancer_in_a_Cohort_of_U_S__Health_Professionals_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -