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Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults.
J Acad Nutr Diet 2015; 115(12):1996-2002JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, and the prevalence of obesity varies by geographic region. Although information on whether SSB intake differs geographically could be valuable for designing targeted interventions, this information is limited.

OBJECTIVE

This cross-sectional study examined associations between living in specific census regions and frequency of SSB consumption among US adults using 2010 National Health Interview Survey data (n=25,431).

METHODS

SSB consumption was defined as the consumption of four types of beverages (regular sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, and sweetened coffee/tea drinks). The exposure variable was census region of residence (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for drinking SSBs after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.

RESULTS

Approximately 64% of adults consumed SSBs ≥1 time/day. The odds of drinking SSBs ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=1.13; 95% CI=1.01, 1.26) but lower among adults living in the Midwest (aOR=0.70; 95% CI=0.64, 0.78) or West (aOR=0.78; 95% CI=0.71, 0.87) compared with those living in the South. By type of SSB, the odds of drinking regular soda ≥1 time/day was significantly lower among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=0.51; 95% CI=0.45, 0.57), Midwest (aOR=0.86; 95% CI=0.78, 0.96), or West (aOR=0.56; 95% CI=0.51, 0.62) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking sports/energy drinks ≥1 time/day were significantly lower among adults living in the West (aOR=0.77; 95% CI=0.64, 0.93) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking a sweetened coffee/tea drink ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=1.60; 95% CI=1.43, 1.78) but lower among adults living in the Midwest (aOR=0.70; 95% CI=0.62, 0.78) than those living in the South.

CONCLUSIONS

Total frequency of SSB consumption and types of SSB consumption differed by geographic region. Interventions to reduce SSB intake could consider regional variations in SSB intake, particularly when more local data are not available.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26231057

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among US Adults." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 115, no. 12, 2015, pp. 1996-2002.
Park S, McGuire LC, Galuska DA. Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015;115(12):1996-2002.
Park, S., McGuire, L. C., & Galuska, D. A. (2015). Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 115(12), pp. 1996-2002. doi:10.1016/j.jand.2015.06.010.
Park S, McGuire LC, Galuska DA. Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake Among US Adults. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2015;115(12):1996-2002. PubMed PMID: 26231057.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Regional Differences in Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake among US Adults. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - McGuire,Lisa C, AU - Galuska,Deborah A, Y1 - 2015/07/29/ PY - 2015/03/04/received PY - 2015/06/05/accepted PY - 2015/8/2/entrez PY - 2015/8/2/pubmed PY - 2016/3/15/medline KW - Fruit-flavored drinks KW - Geographic region KW - Soda KW - Sports and energy drinks KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 1996 EP - 2002 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 115 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes, and the prevalence of obesity varies by geographic region. Although information on whether SSB intake differs geographically could be valuable for designing targeted interventions, this information is limited. OBJECTIVE: This cross-sectional study examined associations between living in specific census regions and frequency of SSB consumption among US adults using 2010 National Health Interview Survey data (n=25,431). METHODS: SSB consumption was defined as the consumption of four types of beverages (regular sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages, fruit drinks, sports/energy drinks, and sweetened coffee/tea drinks). The exposure variable was census region of residence (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% CIs for drinking SSBs after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: Approximately 64% of adults consumed SSBs ≥1 time/day. The odds of drinking SSBs ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=1.13; 95% CI=1.01, 1.26) but lower among adults living in the Midwest (aOR=0.70; 95% CI=0.64, 0.78) or West (aOR=0.78; 95% CI=0.71, 0.87) compared with those living in the South. By type of SSB, the odds of drinking regular soda ≥1 time/day was significantly lower among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=0.51; 95% CI=0.45, 0.57), Midwest (aOR=0.86; 95% CI=0.78, 0.96), or West (aOR=0.56; 95% CI=0.51, 0.62) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking sports/energy drinks ≥1 time/day were significantly lower among adults living in the West (aOR=0.77; 95% CI=0.64, 0.93) than those living in the South. The odds of drinking a sweetened coffee/tea drink ≥1 time/day were significantly higher among adults living in the Northeast (aOR=1.60; 95% CI=1.43, 1.78) but lower among adults living in the Midwest (aOR=0.70; 95% CI=0.62, 0.78) than those living in the South. CONCLUSIONS: Total frequency of SSB consumption and types of SSB consumption differed by geographic region. Interventions to reduce SSB intake could consider regional variations in SSB intake, particularly when more local data are not available. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26231057/Regional_Differences_in_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_among_US_Adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(15)00661-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -