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Potential contribution of African green leafy vegetables and maize porridge composite meals to iron and zinc nutrition.
Nutrition 2015; 31(9):1117-23N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to determine the mineral nutritive value of different traditional African green leafy vegetable (GLV) dishes and their composite meals with fortified and unfortified maize porridge.

METHODS

The mineral (iron, zinc, and calcium) and antinutrient (phytate, total phenolics, and tannins) contents and in vitro bioaccessibility of iron and zinc were analyzed. The iron and zinc contents and bioaccessibilities were used to calculate contribution these dishes and meals could make toward the recommended daily requirements and absolute requirements of vulnerable populations.

RESULTS

It was found that the GLV dishes contained average amounts of zinc (2.8-3.2 mg/100 g, dry base [db]), but were high in both iron (12.5-23.4 mg/100 g, db) and antinutrients (phytate 1420-2089 mg/100 g, db; condensed tannins 105-203 mg/100 g, db). The iron bioaccessibility and amount of bioaccessible iron ranged between 6.7% and 45.2% and 0.9 and 5.11 mg/100 g, db, respectively. The zinc bioaccessibility and amount of bioaccessible zinc ranged between 6.4% and 12.7% and 0.63 and 1.63 mg/100 g, db, respectively.

CONCLUSION

Importantly, although compositing the GLV dishes with fortified maize porridges decreases the iron and zinc contents, because of the low antinutrient content of the maize meal, the amount of bioaccessible iron and zinc in the meal increases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Institute for Food, Nutrition and Well-being, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, South Africa. Electronic address: johanita.kruger@up.ac.za.Centre for Excellence in Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.Non-Communicable Diseases Research Unit, South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa.Centre for Excellence in Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.Centre for Excellence in Nutrition, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26233869

Citation

Kruger, Johanita, et al. "Potential Contribution of African Green Leafy Vegetables and Maize Porridge Composite Meals to Iron and Zinc Nutrition." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 31, no. 9, 2015, pp. 1117-23.
Kruger J, Mongwaketse T, Faber M, et al. Potential contribution of African green leafy vegetables and maize porridge composite meals to iron and zinc nutrition. Nutrition. 2015;31(9):1117-23.
Kruger, J., Mongwaketse, T., Faber, M., van der Hoeven, M., & Smuts, C. M. (2015). Potential contribution of African green leafy vegetables and maize porridge composite meals to iron and zinc nutrition. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 31(9), pp. 1117-23. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2015.04.010.
Kruger J, et al. Potential Contribution of African Green Leafy Vegetables and Maize Porridge Composite Meals to Iron and Zinc Nutrition. Nutrition. 2015;31(9):1117-23. PubMed PMID: 26233869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential contribution of African green leafy vegetables and maize porridge composite meals to iron and zinc nutrition. AU - Kruger,Johanita, AU - Mongwaketse,Tiyapo, AU - Faber,Mieke, AU - van der Hoeven,Marinka, AU - Smuts,Cornelius M, Y1 - 2015/05/11/ PY - 2014/11/26/received PY - 2015/04/13/revised PY - 2015/04/14/accepted PY - 2015/8/3/entrez PY - 2015/8/4/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Bioaccessibility KW - Green leafy vegetable dishes KW - Iron KW - Phytate KW - Tannins KW - Traditional meal KW - Zinc SP - 1117 EP - 23 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 31 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the mineral nutritive value of different traditional African green leafy vegetable (GLV) dishes and their composite meals with fortified and unfortified maize porridge. METHODS: The mineral (iron, zinc, and calcium) and antinutrient (phytate, total phenolics, and tannins) contents and in vitro bioaccessibility of iron and zinc were analyzed. The iron and zinc contents and bioaccessibilities were used to calculate contribution these dishes and meals could make toward the recommended daily requirements and absolute requirements of vulnerable populations. RESULTS: It was found that the GLV dishes contained average amounts of zinc (2.8-3.2 mg/100 g, dry base [db]), but were high in both iron (12.5-23.4 mg/100 g, db) and antinutrients (phytate 1420-2089 mg/100 g, db; condensed tannins 105-203 mg/100 g, db). The iron bioaccessibility and amount of bioaccessible iron ranged between 6.7% and 45.2% and 0.9 and 5.11 mg/100 g, db, respectively. The zinc bioaccessibility and amount of bioaccessible zinc ranged between 6.4% and 12.7% and 0.63 and 1.63 mg/100 g, db, respectively. CONCLUSION: Importantly, although compositing the GLV dishes with fortified maize porridges decreases the iron and zinc contents, because of the low antinutrient content of the maize meal, the amount of bioaccessible iron and zinc in the meal increases. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26233869/Potential_contribution_of_African_green_leafy_vegetables_and_maize_porridge_composite_meals_to_iron_and_zinc_nutrition_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(15)00175-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -