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Metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and deposition) of long-chain n-3 fatty acids is affected by sex and by the oil source (krill oil or fish oil) in the rat.
Br J Nutr. 2015 Sep 14; 114(5):684-92.BJ

Abstract

The effects of krill oil as an alternative source of n-3 long-chain PUFA have been investigated recently. There are conflicting results from the few available studies comparing fish oil and krill oil. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability and metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and tissue deposition) of n-3 fatty acids originating from krill oil (phospholipid-rich) or fish oil (TAG-rich) in rats of both sexes using the whole-body fatty acid balance method. Sprague-Dawley rats (thirty-six male, thirty-six female) were randomly assigned to be fed either a krill oil diet (EPA+DHA+DPA=1·38 mg/g of diet) or a fish oil diet (EPA+DHA+DPA=1·61 mg/g of diet) to constant ration for 6 weeks. The faeces, whole body and individual tissues were analysed for fatty acid content. Absorption of fatty acids was significantly greater in female rats and was only minimally affected by the oil type. It was estimated that most of EPA (>90 %) and more than half of DHA (>60 %) were β-oxidised in both diet groups. Most of the DPA was β-oxidised (57 and 67 % for female and male rats, respectively) in the fish oil group; however, for the krill oil group, the majority of DPA was deposited (82-83 %). There was a significantly greater deposition of DPA and DHA in rats fed krill oil compared with those fed fish oil, not due to a difference in bioavailability (absorption) but rather due to a difference in metabolic fate (anabolism v. catabolism).

Authors+Show Affiliations

1School of Medicine,Deakin University,Geelong,VIC 3216,Australia.2School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Deakin University,Warrnambool,VIC 3280,Australia.2School of Life and Environmental Sciences,Deakin University,Warrnambool,VIC 3280,Australia.1School of Medicine,Deakin University,Geelong,VIC 3216,Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26234617

Citation

Ghasemifard, Samaneh, et al. "Metabolic Fate (absorption, Β-oxidation and Deposition) of Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids Is Affected By Sex and By the Oil Source (krill Oil or Fish Oil) in the Rat." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 114, no. 5, 2015, pp. 684-92.
Ghasemifard S, Hermon K, Turchini GM, et al. Metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and deposition) of long-chain n-3 fatty acids is affected by sex and by the oil source (krill oil or fish oil) in the rat. Br J Nutr. 2015;114(5):684-92.
Ghasemifard, S., Hermon, K., Turchini, G. M., & Sinclair, A. J. (2015). Metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and deposition) of long-chain n-3 fatty acids is affected by sex and by the oil source (krill oil or fish oil) in the rat. The British Journal of Nutrition, 114(5), 684-92. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515002457
Ghasemifard S, et al. Metabolic Fate (absorption, Β-oxidation and Deposition) of Long-chain N-3 Fatty Acids Is Affected By Sex and By the Oil Source (krill Oil or Fish Oil) in the Rat. Br J Nutr. 2015 Sep 14;114(5):684-92. PubMed PMID: 26234617.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and deposition) of long-chain n-3 fatty acids is affected by sex and by the oil source (krill oil or fish oil) in the rat. AU - Ghasemifard,Samaneh, AU - Hermon,Karen, AU - Turchini,Giovanni M, AU - Sinclair,Andrew J, Y1 - 2015/08/03/ PY - 2015/8/4/entrez PY - 2015/8/4/pubmed PY - 2015/11/11/medline KW - BW body weight KW - DHA KW - DPA KW - EPA KW - Krill oil KW - LC-PUFA long-chain PUFA KW - Metabolic fate KW - PL phospholipids KW - Sex KW - Tissue deposition SP - 684 EP - 92 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 114 IS - 5 N2 - The effects of krill oil as an alternative source of n-3 long-chain PUFA have been investigated recently. There are conflicting results from the few available studies comparing fish oil and krill oil. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability and metabolic fate (absorption, β-oxidation and tissue deposition) of n-3 fatty acids originating from krill oil (phospholipid-rich) or fish oil (TAG-rich) in rats of both sexes using the whole-body fatty acid balance method. Sprague-Dawley rats (thirty-six male, thirty-six female) were randomly assigned to be fed either a krill oil diet (EPA+DHA+DPA=1·38 mg/g of diet) or a fish oil diet (EPA+DHA+DPA=1·61 mg/g of diet) to constant ration for 6 weeks. The faeces, whole body and individual tissues were analysed for fatty acid content. Absorption of fatty acids was significantly greater in female rats and was only minimally affected by the oil type. It was estimated that most of EPA (>90 %) and more than half of DHA (>60 %) were β-oxidised in both diet groups. Most of the DPA was β-oxidised (57 and 67 % for female and male rats, respectively) in the fish oil group; however, for the krill oil group, the majority of DPA was deposited (82-83 %). There was a significantly greater deposition of DPA and DHA in rats fed krill oil compared with those fed fish oil, not due to a difference in bioavailability (absorption) but rather due to a difference in metabolic fate (anabolism v. catabolism). SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26234617/Metabolic_fate__absorption_β_oxidation_and_deposition__of_long_chain_n_3_fatty_acids_is_affected_by_sex_and_by_the_oil_source__krill_oil_or_fish_oil__in_the_rat_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114515002457/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -