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Diagnosis before treatment: Identifying dairy farmers' determinants for the adoption of sustainable practices in gastrointestinal nematode control.
Vet Parasitol. 2015 Sep 15; 212(3-4):308-17.VP

Abstract

Anthelmintic resistance is emerging in dairy cattle and this can result in a lack of effective control and production losses. Therefore, sustainable control strategies, such as targeted treatments (TT) and targeted selected treatments (TST), should be adopted by the industry. TT and TST approaches require the use of diagnostic methods to take informed treatment decisions. To understand the factors affecting the farmers' intention to adopt diagnostic methods before implementing anthelmintic drugs ('adoption intention'), a cross-sectional survey was carried out in dairy farms in Belgium (Flanders). A framework was constructed to predict adoption intentions based on two fundamental theories in the field of behavioural psychology and health psychology: the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model. In the tested model, adoption intentions were predicted based on attitudes towards anthelminthics, attitudes towards diagnostic methods, subjective norms, behavioural control and perceived risk. Structural equation modelling was used for analyses. The model fitted the data well and explained 46% of the variance in adoption intention of diagnostics. The factors 'attitude towards diagnostic methods' and 'subjective norm'; i.e. the influence of significant others, had the strongest, positive influence on adoption intention of diagnostic methods. 'Perceived behavioural control' had a weak, positive effect on intention. Further, 'attitude towards the use of anthelmintic drugs' had a negative effect on adoption intention of the diagnostic methods. This implicates an effect of current behaviour on future adoption, which should be considered in future research. Factors measuring risk perception of anthelmintic resistance; perceived severity and perceived susceptibility, had no effect on the adoption intention of diagnostic methods. The threat of anthelmintic resistance is perceived to be low for dairy herds. The study further did not find any differences in the effects of the predictors for young stock and adult dairy cows. The results of this study can be used to develop communication strategies to advertise sustainable nematode control on dairy farms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium; Department of Communication Studies, Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, Ghent University, Korte Meer 7-11, 9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address: fiona.vandevelde@ugent.be.Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.Department of Communication Studies, Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, Ghent University, Korte Meer 7-11, 9000 Gent, Belgium.Department of Communication Studies, Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, Ghent University, Korte Meer 7-11, 9000 Gent, Belgium.Veepeiler Rund, Animal Health Care Flanders (Dierengezondheidszorg Vlaanderen), Deinse Horsweg 1, 9031 Drongen, Belgium.Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, 9820 Merelbeke, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26238655

Citation

Vande Velde, F, et al. "Diagnosis Before Treatment: Identifying Dairy Farmers' Determinants for the Adoption of Sustainable Practices in Gastrointestinal Nematode Control." Veterinary Parasitology, vol. 212, no. 3-4, 2015, pp. 308-17.
Vande Velde F, Claerebout E, Cauberghe V, et al. Diagnosis before treatment: Identifying dairy farmers' determinants for the adoption of sustainable practices in gastrointestinal nematode control. Vet Parasitol. 2015;212(3-4):308-17.
Vande Velde, F., Claerebout, E., Cauberghe, V., Hudders, L., Van Loo, H., Vercruysse, J., & Charlier, J. (2015). Diagnosis before treatment: Identifying dairy farmers' determinants for the adoption of sustainable practices in gastrointestinal nematode control. Veterinary Parasitology, 212(3-4), 308-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2015.07.013
Vande Velde F, et al. Diagnosis Before Treatment: Identifying Dairy Farmers' Determinants for the Adoption of Sustainable Practices in Gastrointestinal Nematode Control. Vet Parasitol. 2015 Sep 15;212(3-4):308-17. PubMed PMID: 26238655.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diagnosis before treatment: Identifying dairy farmers' determinants for the adoption of sustainable practices in gastrointestinal nematode control. AU - Vande Velde,F, AU - Claerebout,E, AU - Cauberghe,V, AU - Hudders,L, AU - Van Loo,H, AU - Vercruysse,J, AU - Charlier,J, Y1 - 2015/07/20/ PY - 2015/03/03/received PY - 2015/06/10/revised PY - 2015/07/14/accepted PY - 2015/8/5/entrez PY - 2015/8/5/pubmed PY - 2016/8/9/medline KW - Adoption intention KW - Anthelmintic resistance KW - Dairy farms KW - Diagnostics KW - Farmers’ behaviour KW - GIN control KW - Structural equation modelling SP - 308 EP - 17 JF - Veterinary parasitology JO - Vet. Parasitol. VL - 212 IS - 3-4 N2 - Anthelmintic resistance is emerging in dairy cattle and this can result in a lack of effective control and production losses. Therefore, sustainable control strategies, such as targeted treatments (TT) and targeted selected treatments (TST), should be adopted by the industry. TT and TST approaches require the use of diagnostic methods to take informed treatment decisions. To understand the factors affecting the farmers' intention to adopt diagnostic methods before implementing anthelmintic drugs ('adoption intention'), a cross-sectional survey was carried out in dairy farms in Belgium (Flanders). A framework was constructed to predict adoption intentions based on two fundamental theories in the field of behavioural psychology and health psychology: the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Health Belief Model. In the tested model, adoption intentions were predicted based on attitudes towards anthelminthics, attitudes towards diagnostic methods, subjective norms, behavioural control and perceived risk. Structural equation modelling was used for analyses. The model fitted the data well and explained 46% of the variance in adoption intention of diagnostics. The factors 'attitude towards diagnostic methods' and 'subjective norm'; i.e. the influence of significant others, had the strongest, positive influence on adoption intention of diagnostic methods. 'Perceived behavioural control' had a weak, positive effect on intention. Further, 'attitude towards the use of anthelmintic drugs' had a negative effect on adoption intention of the diagnostic methods. This implicates an effect of current behaviour on future adoption, which should be considered in future research. Factors measuring risk perception of anthelmintic resistance; perceived severity and perceived susceptibility, had no effect on the adoption intention of diagnostic methods. The threat of anthelmintic resistance is perceived to be low for dairy herds. The study further did not find any differences in the effects of the predictors for young stock and adult dairy cows. The results of this study can be used to develop communication strategies to advertise sustainable nematode control on dairy farms. SN - 1873-2550 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26238655/Diagnosis_before_treatment:_Identifying_dairy_farmers'_determinants_for_the_adoption_of_sustainable_practices_in_gastrointestinal_nematode_control_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-4017(15)00342-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -