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Short-term effects of integrated motor imagery practice on muscle activation and force performance.
Neuroscience. 2015 Oct 01; 305:146-56.N

Abstract

The effect of motor imagery (MI) practice on isometric force development is well-documented. However, whether practicing MI during rest periods of physical training improves the forthcoming performance remains unexplored. We involved 18 athletes in a counterbalanced design including three physical training sessions scheduled over five consecutive days. Training involved 10 maximal isometric contractions against a force plate, with the elbow at 90°. During two sessions, we integrated MI practice (focusing on either muscle activation or relaxation) during the inter-trial rest periods. We measured muscle performance from force plate and electromyograms of the biceps brachii and anterior deltoideus. We continuously monitored electrodermal activity (EDA) to control sympathetic nervous system activity. MI of muscle activation resulted in higher isometric force as compared to both MI of muscle relaxation and passive recovery (respectively +2.1% and +3.5%). MI practice of muscle relaxation also outperformed the control condition (+1.9%). Increased activation of the biceps brachii was recorded under both MI practice conditions compared to control. Biceps brachii activation was similar between the two MI practice conditions, but electromyography revealed a marginal trend toward greater activation of the anterior deltoideus during MI practice of muscle activation. EDA and self-reports indicated that these effects were independent from physiological arousal and motivation. These results might account for priming effects of MI practice yielding to higher muscle activation and force performance. Present findings may be of interest for applications in sports training and neurologic rehabilitation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France. Electronic address: franck.di-rienzo@univ-lyon1.fr.Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; University of Montreal, Simulation & Movement Modeling Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Montréal, Canada.Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasília, Distrito Federal, Brazil.Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France.Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France.Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Centre de Recherche et d'Innovation sur le Sport, EA 647, 27-29 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Boulevard Saint-Michel, 75005 Paris, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26241339

Citation

Di Rienzo, F, et al. "Short-term Effects of Integrated Motor Imagery Practice On Muscle Activation and Force Performance." Neuroscience, vol. 305, 2015, pp. 146-56.
Di Rienzo F, Blache Y, Kanthack TF, et al. Short-term effects of integrated motor imagery practice on muscle activation and force performance. Neuroscience. 2015;305:146-56.
Di Rienzo, F., Blache, Y., Kanthack, T. F., Monteil, K., Collet, C., & Guillot, A. (2015). Short-term effects of integrated motor imagery practice on muscle activation and force performance. Neuroscience, 305, 146-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.07.080
Di Rienzo F, et al. Short-term Effects of Integrated Motor Imagery Practice On Muscle Activation and Force Performance. Neuroscience. 2015 Oct 1;305:146-56. PubMed PMID: 26241339.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term effects of integrated motor imagery practice on muscle activation and force performance. AU - Di Rienzo,F, AU - Blache,Y, AU - Kanthack,T F D, AU - Monteil,K, AU - Collet,C, AU - Guillot,A, Y1 - 2015/08/01/ PY - 2015/04/24/received PY - 2015/07/24/revised PY - 2015/07/30/accepted PY - 2015/8/5/entrez PY - 2015/8/5/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline KW - force development KW - mental practice KW - rehabilitation KW - training SP - 146 EP - 56 JF - Neuroscience JO - Neuroscience VL - 305 N2 - The effect of motor imagery (MI) practice on isometric force development is well-documented. However, whether practicing MI during rest periods of physical training improves the forthcoming performance remains unexplored. We involved 18 athletes in a counterbalanced design including three physical training sessions scheduled over five consecutive days. Training involved 10 maximal isometric contractions against a force plate, with the elbow at 90°. During two sessions, we integrated MI practice (focusing on either muscle activation or relaxation) during the inter-trial rest periods. We measured muscle performance from force plate and electromyograms of the biceps brachii and anterior deltoideus. We continuously monitored electrodermal activity (EDA) to control sympathetic nervous system activity. MI of muscle activation resulted in higher isometric force as compared to both MI of muscle relaxation and passive recovery (respectively +2.1% and +3.5%). MI practice of muscle relaxation also outperformed the control condition (+1.9%). Increased activation of the biceps brachii was recorded under both MI practice conditions compared to control. Biceps brachii activation was similar between the two MI practice conditions, but electromyography revealed a marginal trend toward greater activation of the anterior deltoideus during MI practice of muscle activation. EDA and self-reports indicated that these effects were independent from physiological arousal and motivation. These results might account for priming effects of MI practice yielding to higher muscle activation and force performance. Present findings may be of interest for applications in sports training and neurologic rehabilitation. SN - 1873-7544 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26241339/Short_term_effects_of_integrated_motor_imagery_practice_on_muscle_activation_and_force_performance_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4522(15)00707-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -