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Psychosocial factors of caregiver burden in child caregivers: results from the new national study of caregiving.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Over 50 million informal caregivers in the United States provide care to an aging adult, saving the economy hundreds of billions of dollars annually from costly hospitalization or institutionalization. Despite the benefits associated with caregiving, caregiver stress can lead to negative physical and mental health consequences, or "caregiver burden". Given these potential negative consequences of caregiver burden, it is important not only to understand the multidimensional components of burden but to also understand the experience from the perspective of the caregiver themselves. Therefore, the objectives of our study are to use exploratory factor analysis to obtain a set of latent factors among a subset of caregiver burden questions identified in previous studies and assess their reliability.

METHODS

All data was obtained from the 2011 National Study of Caregiving (NSOC). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to identify a set of latent factors assessing four domains of caregiver burden in "child caregivers": those informal caregivers who provide care to a parent or stepparent. Sensitivity analysis was also conducted by repeating the EFA on demographic subsets of caregivers.

RESULTS

After multiple factor analyses, four consistent caregiver burden factors emerged from the 23 questions analyzed: Negative emotional, positive emotional, social, and financial. Reliability of each factor varied, and was strongest for the positive emotional domain for caregiver burden. These domains were generally consistent across demographic subsets of informal caregivers.

CONCLUSION

These results provide researchers a more comprehensive understanding of caregiver burden to target interventions to protect caregiver health and maintain this vital component of the US health care system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 830 E. Main Street, 8th Floor, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA, 23298-0212, USA. scohen@vcu.edu.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 830 E. Main Street, 8th Floor, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA, 23298-0212, USA. scook2@vcu.edu.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 830 E. Main Street, 8th Floor, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA, 23298-0212, USA. kelleyl@vcu.edu.Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 830 E. Main Street, 8th Floor, P.O. Box 980212, Richmond, VA, 23298-0212, USA. sandota@vcu.edu.Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA. phillipsae4@vcu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26246132

Citation

Cohen, Steven A., et al. "Psychosocial Factors of Caregiver Burden in Child Caregivers: Results From the New National Study of Caregiving." Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, vol. 13, 2015, p. 120.
Cohen SA, Cook S, Kelley L, et al. Psychosocial factors of caregiver burden in child caregivers: results from the new national study of caregiving. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2015;13:120.
Cohen, S. A., Cook, S., Kelley, L., Sando, T., & Bell, A. E. (2015). Psychosocial factors of caregiver burden in child caregivers: results from the new national study of caregiving. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 13, p. 120. doi:10.1186/s12955-015-0317-2.
Cohen SA, et al. Psychosocial Factors of Caregiver Burden in Child Caregivers: Results From the New National Study of Caregiving. Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2015 Aug 7;13:120. PubMed PMID: 26246132.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial factors of caregiver burden in child caregivers: results from the new national study of caregiving. AU - Cohen,Steven A, AU - Cook,Sarah, AU - Kelley,Lauren, AU - Sando,Trisha, AU - Bell,Allison E, Y1 - 2015/08/07/ PY - 2015/04/06/received PY - 2015/07/27/accepted PY - 2015/8/7/entrez PY - 2015/8/8/pubmed PY - 2016/2/18/medline SP - 120 EP - 120 JF - Health and quality of life outcomes JO - Health Qual Life Outcomes VL - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Over 50 million informal caregivers in the United States provide care to an aging adult, saving the economy hundreds of billions of dollars annually from costly hospitalization or institutionalization. Despite the benefits associated with caregiving, caregiver stress can lead to negative physical and mental health consequences, or "caregiver burden". Given these potential negative consequences of caregiver burden, it is important not only to understand the multidimensional components of burden but to also understand the experience from the perspective of the caregiver themselves. Therefore, the objectives of our study are to use exploratory factor analysis to obtain a set of latent factors among a subset of caregiver burden questions identified in previous studies and assess their reliability. METHODS: All data was obtained from the 2011 National Study of Caregiving (NSOC). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed to identify a set of latent factors assessing four domains of caregiver burden in "child caregivers": those informal caregivers who provide care to a parent or stepparent. Sensitivity analysis was also conducted by repeating the EFA on demographic subsets of caregivers. RESULTS: After multiple factor analyses, four consistent caregiver burden factors emerged from the 23 questions analyzed: Negative emotional, positive emotional, social, and financial. Reliability of each factor varied, and was strongest for the positive emotional domain for caregiver burden. These domains were generally consistent across demographic subsets of informal caregivers. CONCLUSION: These results provide researchers a more comprehensive understanding of caregiver burden to target interventions to protect caregiver health and maintain this vital component of the US health care system. SN - 1477-7525 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26246132/Psychosocial_factors_of_caregiver_burden_in_child_caregivers:_results_from_the_new_national_study_of_caregiving_ L2 - https://hqlo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12955-015-0317-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -