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History of uterine leiomyomata and incidence of breast cancer.

Abstract

PURPOSE

Uterine leiomyomata (UL), benign tumors of the myometrium, are influenced by sex steroid hormones. A history of UL diagnosis has been associated with a higher risk of uterine malignancies. The relation between UL and breast cancer, another hormonally responsive cancer, has not been studied.

METHODS

We investigated the association between self-reported physician-diagnosed UL and incidence of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study. We followed 57,747 participants without a history of breast cancer from 1995 to 2013. UL diagnoses were reported at baseline and biennially. Breast cancer was reported on biennial questionnaires and confirmed by pathology data from medical records or cancer registries. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) and adjust for potential confounders.

RESULTS

There were 2,276 incident cases of breast cancer (1,699 invasive, 394 in situ, and 183 unknown) during 879,672 person-years of follow-up. The multivariable IRR for the overall association between history of UL and breast cancer incidence was 0.99 (95 % CI 0.90-1.08), with similar results for ER + (IRR = 1.03) and ER - breast cancer (IRR = 1.05). IRRs for early diagnosis of UL (before age 30) were slightly above 1.0, with IRRs of 1.14 (95 % CI 0.99-1.31) for overall breast cancer, 1.14 (95 % CI 0.93-1.40) for ER + breast cancer, and 1.20 (95 % CI 0.89-1.61) for ER - breast cancer. IRRs for early diagnosis of UL were elevated for breast cancer diagnosed before 40 years of age (IRR = 1.39, 95 % CI 0.97-1.99) and premenopausal breast cancer (IRR = 1.26, 95 % CI 1.01-1.58). No consistent patterns in risk were observed across estrogen receptor subtypes, and IRRs did not differ appreciably within strata of BMI, female hormone use, mammography recency, or family history of breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study of US black women suggests that a history of UL diagnosis is unrelated to the incidence of breast cancer overall. The positive associations observed for early diagnosed UL with breast cancer before age 40 and with premenopausal breast cancer require confirmation in future studies.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, 1010 Commonwealth Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. lwise@bu.edu. Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. lwise@bu.edu.

    ,

    Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, 1010 Commonwealth Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, USA.

    ,

    Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, 1010 Commonwealth Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

    ,

    Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA.

    Slone Epidemiology Center, Boston University, 1010 Commonwealth Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

    Source

    Cancer causes & control : CCC 26:10 2015 Oct pg 1487-93

    MeSH

    Adult
    African Americans
    Breast Neoplasms
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Leiomyoma
    Middle Aged
    Neoplasms, Second Primary
    Prospective Studies
    Receptors, Estrogen
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Uterine Neoplasms

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26250515

    Citation

    Wise, Lauren A., et al. "History of Uterine Leiomyomata and Incidence of Breast Cancer." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 26, no. 10, 2015, pp. 1487-93.
    Wise LA, Radin RG, Rosenberg L, et al. History of uterine leiomyomata and incidence of breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(10):1487-93.
    Wise, L. A., Radin, R. G., Rosenberg, L., Adams-Campbell, L., & Palmer, J. R. (2015). History of uterine leiomyomata and incidence of breast cancer. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 26(10), pp. 1487-93. doi:10.1007/s10552-015-0647-8.
    Wise LA, et al. History of Uterine Leiomyomata and Incidence of Breast Cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2015;26(10):1487-93. PubMed PMID: 26250515.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - History of uterine leiomyomata and incidence of breast cancer. AU - Wise,Lauren A, AU - Radin,Rose G, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, AU - Adams-Campbell,Lucile, AU - Palmer,Julie R, Y1 - 2015/08/07/ PY - 2015/05/27/received PY - 2015/07/28/accepted PY - 2015/8/8/entrez PY - 2015/8/8/pubmed PY - 2016/5/5/medline KW - Black women KW - Breast carcinoma KW - Estrogen receptor KW - Prospective studies KW - Uterine leiomyoma SP - 1487 EP - 93 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 26 IS - 10 N2 - PURPOSE: Uterine leiomyomata (UL), benign tumors of the myometrium, are influenced by sex steroid hormones. A history of UL diagnosis has been associated with a higher risk of uterine malignancies. The relation between UL and breast cancer, another hormonally responsive cancer, has not been studied. METHODS: We investigated the association between self-reported physician-diagnosed UL and incidence of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study, a prospective cohort study. We followed 57,747 participants without a history of breast cancer from 1995 to 2013. UL diagnoses were reported at baseline and biennially. Breast cancer was reported on biennial questionnaires and confirmed by pathology data from medical records or cancer registries. Cox regression was used to derive incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) and adjust for potential confounders. RESULTS: There were 2,276 incident cases of breast cancer (1,699 invasive, 394 in situ, and 183 unknown) during 879,672 person-years of follow-up. The multivariable IRR for the overall association between history of UL and breast cancer incidence was 0.99 (95 % CI 0.90-1.08), with similar results for ER + (IRR = 1.03) and ER - breast cancer (IRR = 1.05). IRRs for early diagnosis of UL (before age 30) were slightly above 1.0, with IRRs of 1.14 (95 % CI 0.99-1.31) for overall breast cancer, 1.14 (95 % CI 0.93-1.40) for ER + breast cancer, and 1.20 (95 % CI 0.89-1.61) for ER - breast cancer. IRRs for early diagnosis of UL were elevated for breast cancer diagnosed before 40 years of age (IRR = 1.39, 95 % CI 0.97-1.99) and premenopausal breast cancer (IRR = 1.26, 95 % CI 1.01-1.58). No consistent patterns in risk were observed across estrogen receptor subtypes, and IRRs did not differ appreciably within strata of BMI, female hormone use, mammography recency, or family history of breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The present study of US black women suggests that a history of UL diagnosis is unrelated to the incidence of breast cancer overall. The positive associations observed for early diagnosed UL with breast cancer before age 40 and with premenopausal breast cancer require confirmation in future studies. SN - 1573-7225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26250515/History_of_uterine_leiomyomata_and_incidence_of_breast_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-015-0647-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -