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Low-lycopene containing tomato powder diet does not protect against prostate cancer in TRAMP mice.
Nutr Res. 2015 Oct; 35(10):882-890.NR

Abstract

Previously, tomato powder (TP) diets initiated postweaning have been shown to be effective in reducing prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The TRAMP model develops and progresses through all stages of carcinogenesis similarly to humans. We hypothesized that a 10% TP diet intervention after puberty would reduce carcinogenesis at 12, 16, and 20 weeks of age in TRAMP mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 X FVB F1 TRAMP mice were randomized to consume either an AIN-93G + 10% TP diet (n = 90) or the AIN-93G control diet (n = 88) and randomized to 1 of 3 end point ages: 12 (n = 59), 16 (n = 60), or 20 (n = 59) weeks of age. There was no difference between diets in overall cancer incidence at any time point. However, at 16 weeks of age, TP significantly increased high-grade PIN (P = .014) and significantly decreased poorly differentiated (P = .024) lesions compared with the control diet suggesting a delay in the progression of prostate cancer. Two variables that may explain the modest effect of TP in this study are as follows: the low amount of lycopene in the TP diet (12.3 ppm) and the timing of the intervention (8 weeks of age). The TP diet contained 30-fold less lycopene than previous studies in our laboratory. In addition, the initiation of the diet intervention time of 8 weeks of age instead of 4 weeks of age may have been too late in cancer progression to substantially impact carcinogenesis. In conclusion, a low-lycopene TP intervention failed to reduce carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana IL 61802, USA.Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address: jwerdman@illinois.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26255194

Citation

Conlon, Lauren E., et al. "Low-lycopene Containing Tomato Powder Diet Does Not Protect Against Prostate Cancer in TRAMP Mice." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 35, no. 10, 2015, pp. 882-890.
Conlon LE, Wallig MA, Erdman JW. Low-lycopene containing tomato powder diet does not protect against prostate cancer in TRAMP mice. Nutr Res. 2015;35(10):882-890.
Conlon, L. E., Wallig, M. A., & Erdman, J. W. (2015). Low-lycopene containing tomato powder diet does not protect against prostate cancer in TRAMP mice. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 35(10), 882-890. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2015.07.003
Conlon LE, Wallig MA, Erdman JW. Low-lycopene Containing Tomato Powder Diet Does Not Protect Against Prostate Cancer in TRAMP Mice. Nutr Res. 2015;35(10):882-890. PubMed PMID: 26255194.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low-lycopene containing tomato powder diet does not protect against prostate cancer in TRAMP mice. AU - Conlon,Lauren E, AU - Wallig,Matthew A, AU - Erdman,John W,Jr Y1 - 2015/07/11/ PY - 2015/06/05/received PY - 2015/07/09/revised PY - 2015/07/09/accepted PY - 2015/8/10/entrez PY - 2015/8/10/pubmed PY - 2016/6/22/medline KW - Cancer KW - Diet KW - Lycopene KW - Mice KW - Prostate KW - TRAMP KW - Tomato SP - 882 EP - 890 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 35 IS - 10 N2 - Previously, tomato powder (TP) diets initiated postweaning have been shown to be effective in reducing prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. The TRAMP model develops and progresses through all stages of carcinogenesis similarly to humans. We hypothesized that a 10% TP diet intervention after puberty would reduce carcinogenesis at 12, 16, and 20 weeks of age in TRAMP mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 X FVB F1 TRAMP mice were randomized to consume either an AIN-93G + 10% TP diet (n = 90) or the AIN-93G control diet (n = 88) and randomized to 1 of 3 end point ages: 12 (n = 59), 16 (n = 60), or 20 (n = 59) weeks of age. There was no difference between diets in overall cancer incidence at any time point. However, at 16 weeks of age, TP significantly increased high-grade PIN (P = .014) and significantly decreased poorly differentiated (P = .024) lesions compared with the control diet suggesting a delay in the progression of prostate cancer. Two variables that may explain the modest effect of TP in this study are as follows: the low amount of lycopene in the TP diet (12.3 ppm) and the timing of the intervention (8 weeks of age). The TP diet contained 30-fold less lycopene than previous studies in our laboratory. In addition, the initiation of the diet intervention time of 8 weeks of age instead of 4 weeks of age may have been too late in cancer progression to substantially impact carcinogenesis. In conclusion, a low-lycopene TP intervention failed to reduce carcinogenesis in TRAMP mice. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26255194/Low_lycopene_containing_tomato_powder_diet_does_not_protect_against_prostate_cancer_in_TRAMP_mice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(15)00168-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -