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Breastfeeding difficulties and oral cavity anomalies: The influence of posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2015; 79(10):1714-7IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Oral cavity anomalies may contribute to breastfeeding problems. The objective of this study was to describe our experience in a high-volume breastfeeding difficulty clinic with a focus on posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties.

METHODS

A retrospective review of patients from a dedicated breastfeeding difficulty clinic from January 2014 to December 2014 was performed. Those identified to have ankyloglossia and/or upper-lip ties underwent release procedures. Subjective breastfeeding changes were documented afterwards.

RESULTS

Of the 618 total patients, 290 (47%) had anterior ankyloglossia, 120 (19%) had posterior ankyloglossia, and 14 (2%) had upper-lip tie. Some patients had both anterior ankyloglossia and upper lip-tie (6%), or posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip tie (5%). For those with anterior ankyloglossia, 78% reported some degree of improvement in breastfeeding after frenotomy. For those with posterior ankyloglossia, 91% reported some degree of improvement in breastfeeding after frenotomy. Upper lip-tie release also led to improved breastfeeding (100%).

CONCLUSIONS

Anterior and posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip tie, or combinations thereof, were commonly recognized in our study population. Many newborns, however, also had no oral cavity anomalies. Although causation cannot be implied, these oral cavity anomalies may contribute to breastfeeding difficulties in some cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, United States; Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Diego, CA, United States. Electronic address: spranky@rchsd.org.Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, CA, United States.Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada. Electronic address: Paul.Hong@iwk.nshealth.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26255605

Citation

Pransky, Seth M., et al. "Breastfeeding Difficulties and Oral Cavity Anomalies: the Influence of Posterior Ankyloglossia and Upper-lip Ties." International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, vol. 79, no. 10, 2015, pp. 1714-7.
Pransky SM, Lago D, Hong P. Breastfeeding difficulties and oral cavity anomalies: The influence of posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015;79(10):1714-7.
Pransky, S. M., Lago, D., & Hong, P. (2015). Breastfeeding difficulties and oral cavity anomalies: The influence of posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 79(10), pp. 1714-7. doi:10.1016/j.ijporl.2015.07.033.
Pransky SM, Lago D, Hong P. Breastfeeding Difficulties and Oral Cavity Anomalies: the Influence of Posterior Ankyloglossia and Upper-lip Ties. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2015;79(10):1714-7. PubMed PMID: 26255605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breastfeeding difficulties and oral cavity anomalies: The influence of posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties. AU - Pransky,Seth M, AU - Lago,Denise, AU - Hong,Paul, Y1 - 2015/07/31/ PY - 2015/06/19/received PY - 2015/07/23/revised PY - 2015/07/24/accepted PY - 2015/8/11/entrez PY - 2015/8/11/pubmed PY - 2016/4/27/medline KW - Ankyloglossia KW - Breastfeeding difficulty KW - Frenotomy KW - Frenulotomy KW - Upper-lip tie SP - 1714 EP - 7 JF - International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology JO - Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol. VL - 79 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Oral cavity anomalies may contribute to breastfeeding problems. The objective of this study was to describe our experience in a high-volume breastfeeding difficulty clinic with a focus on posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip ties. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients from a dedicated breastfeeding difficulty clinic from January 2014 to December 2014 was performed. Those identified to have ankyloglossia and/or upper-lip ties underwent release procedures. Subjective breastfeeding changes were documented afterwards. RESULTS: Of the 618 total patients, 290 (47%) had anterior ankyloglossia, 120 (19%) had posterior ankyloglossia, and 14 (2%) had upper-lip tie. Some patients had both anterior ankyloglossia and upper lip-tie (6%), or posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip tie (5%). For those with anterior ankyloglossia, 78% reported some degree of improvement in breastfeeding after frenotomy. For those with posterior ankyloglossia, 91% reported some degree of improvement in breastfeeding after frenotomy. Upper lip-tie release also led to improved breastfeeding (100%). CONCLUSIONS: Anterior and posterior ankyloglossia and upper-lip tie, or combinations thereof, were commonly recognized in our study population. Many newborns, however, also had no oral cavity anomalies. Although causation cannot be implied, these oral cavity anomalies may contribute to breastfeeding difficulties in some cases. SN - 1872-8464 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26255605/Breastfeeding_difficulties_and_oral_cavity_anomalies:_The_influence_of_posterior_ankyloglossia_and_upper_lip_ties_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-5876(15)00368-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -