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Coculture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with a Nonpathogenic E. coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model.
Infect Immun. 2015 Nov; 83(11):4185-93.II

Abstract

Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a notorious foodborne pathogen due to its low infectious dose and the disease symptoms it causes, which include bloody diarrhea and severe abdominal cramps. In some cases, the disease progresses to hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), due to the expression of one or more Shiga toxins (Stx). Isoforms of Stx, including Stx2a, are encoded within temperate prophages. In the presence of certain antibiotics, phage induction occurs, which also increases the expression of toxin genes. Additionally, increased Stx2 accumulation has been reported when O157:H7 was cocultured with phage-susceptible nonpathogenic E. coli. This study characterized an E. coli O157:H7 strain, designated PA2, that belongs to the hypervirulent clade 8 cluster. Stx2a levels after ciprofloxacin induction were lower for PA2 than for the prototypical outbreak strains Sakai and EDL933. However, during coculture with the nonpathogenic strain E. coli C600, PA2 produced Stx2a levels that were 2- to 12-fold higher than those observed during coculture with EDL933 and Sakai, respectively. Germfree mice cocolonized by PA2 and C600 showed greater kidney damage, increased Stx2a accumulation in feces, and more visible signs of disease than mice given PA2 or C600 alone. These data suggest one mechanism by which microorganisms associated with the colonic microbiota could enhance the virulence of E. coli O157:H7, particularly a subset of clade 8 strains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Food Science, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Food Science, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.Department of Food Science, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA Center for Immunology and Infectious Disease, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA dudley@psu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26259815

Citation

Goswami, Kakolie, et al. "Coculture of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 With a Nonpathogenic E. Coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model." Infection and Immunity, vol. 83, no. 11, 2015, pp. 4185-93.
Goswami K, Chen C, Xiaoli L, et al. Coculture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with a Nonpathogenic E. coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model. Infect Immun. 2015;83(11):4185-93.
Goswami, K., Chen, C., Xiaoli, L., Eaton, K. A., & Dudley, E. G. (2015). Coculture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with a Nonpathogenic E. coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model. Infection and Immunity, 83(11), 4185-93. https://doi.org/10.1128/IAI.00663-15
Goswami K, et al. Coculture of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 With a Nonpathogenic E. Coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model. Infect Immun. 2015;83(11):4185-93. PubMed PMID: 26259815.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coculture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 with a Nonpathogenic E. coli Strain Increases Toxin Production and Virulence in a Germfree Mouse Model. AU - Goswami,Kakolie, AU - Chen,Chun, AU - Xiaoli,Lingzi, AU - Eaton,Kathryn A, AU - Dudley,Edward G, Y1 - 2015/08/10/ PY - 2015/05/19/received PY - 2015/08/05/accepted PY - 2015/8/12/entrez PY - 2015/8/12/pubmed PY - 2016/1/31/medline SP - 4185 EP - 93 JF - Infection and immunity JO - Infect Immun VL - 83 IS - 11 N2 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a notorious foodborne pathogen due to its low infectious dose and the disease symptoms it causes, which include bloody diarrhea and severe abdominal cramps. In some cases, the disease progresses to hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), due to the expression of one or more Shiga toxins (Stx). Isoforms of Stx, including Stx2a, are encoded within temperate prophages. In the presence of certain antibiotics, phage induction occurs, which also increases the expression of toxin genes. Additionally, increased Stx2 accumulation has been reported when O157:H7 was cocultured with phage-susceptible nonpathogenic E. coli. This study characterized an E. coli O157:H7 strain, designated PA2, that belongs to the hypervirulent clade 8 cluster. Stx2a levels after ciprofloxacin induction were lower for PA2 than for the prototypical outbreak strains Sakai and EDL933. However, during coculture with the nonpathogenic strain E. coli C600, PA2 produced Stx2a levels that were 2- to 12-fold higher than those observed during coculture with EDL933 and Sakai, respectively. Germfree mice cocolonized by PA2 and C600 showed greater kidney damage, increased Stx2a accumulation in feces, and more visible signs of disease than mice given PA2 or C600 alone. These data suggest one mechanism by which microorganisms associated with the colonic microbiota could enhance the virulence of E. coli O157:H7, particularly a subset of clade 8 strains. SN - 1098-5522 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26259815/Coculture_of_Escherichia_coli_O157:H7_with_a_Nonpathogenic_E__coli_Strain_Increases_Toxin_Production_and_Virulence_in_a_Germfree_Mouse_Model_ L2 - http://iai.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26259815 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -