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Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice?
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Dec; 22(24):19497-506.ES

Abstract

The bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) to rice may be complicated by chemical and biological factors in the rhizosphere. The aim of this work is to investigate how soil iron (Fe) redox transformations and low-molecular-weight organic acid (LMWOA) exudation from root affect Cd accumulation in rice. Two soils (a paddy soil and a saline soil) with different physicochemical properties were used in this study. Soil redox conditions were changed by flooding and addition of organic matter (OM). Two days after the soil treatments, rice seedlings were transplanted in a vermiculite-soil system and grown for 10 days. We measured pH and Eh, LMWOA, Fe and Cd contents in rice, and their fractions in the soils and vermiculite. Cadmium accumulation in rice declined in both soils upon the flooding and OM treatment. Iron dissolution in the paddy soil and its deposition in the rhizosphere significantly increased upon the OM addition, but the concentration of Fe plaque on the rice root significantly declined. Conversely, although Fe transformed into less active fractions in the saline soil, Fe accumulation on the surface and in the tissue of root was considerably enhanced. The secretion of LMWOA was remarkably induced when the OM was amended in the saline soil, but the same effect was not observed in the paddy soil. Reduction of Cd uptake by rice could be attributed to different factors in the two soils. For the paddy soil, the lowered Cd bioavailability was likely due to the competition of Fe and Cd for the binding sites on the vermiculite surface. For the saline soil, however, rice responded to the low Fe mobility through more LMWOA exudation and Fe plaque formation, and their increases could explain the decrease of rice Cd.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China.College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China.College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China.Demonstration Laboratory of Elements and Life Science Research, Laboratory Centre of Life Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China.College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Marine Biology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, 210095, People's Republic of China. yingge711@njau.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26260840

Citation

Chen, Xue, et al. "Do Soil Fe Transformation and Secretion of Low-molecular-weight Organic Acids Affect the Availability of Cd to Rice?" Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 22, no. 24, 2015, pp. 19497-506.
Chen X, Yang Y, Liu D, et al. Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice? Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015;22(24):19497-506.
Chen, X., Yang, Y., Liu, D., Zhang, C., & Ge, Y. (2015). Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice? Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 22(24), 19497-506. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-5134-y
Chen X, et al. Do Soil Fe Transformation and Secretion of Low-molecular-weight Organic Acids Affect the Availability of Cd to Rice. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015;22(24):19497-506. PubMed PMID: 26260840.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do soil Fe transformation and secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids affect the availability of Cd to rice? AU - Chen,Xue, AU - Yang,Yazhou, AU - Liu,Danqing, AU - Zhang,Chunhua, AU - Ge,Ying, Y1 - 2015/08/12/ PY - 2015/05/02/received PY - 2015/07/29/accepted PY - 2015/8/12/entrez PY - 2015/8/12/pubmed PY - 2016/8/4/medline KW - Bioavailability KW - Cadmium KW - Iron KW - Organic acids KW - Rice KW - Soils SP - 19497 EP - 506 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 22 IS - 24 N2 - The bioavailability of cadmium (Cd) to rice may be complicated by chemical and biological factors in the rhizosphere. The aim of this work is to investigate how soil iron (Fe) redox transformations and low-molecular-weight organic acid (LMWOA) exudation from root affect Cd accumulation in rice. Two soils (a paddy soil and a saline soil) with different physicochemical properties were used in this study. Soil redox conditions were changed by flooding and addition of organic matter (OM). Two days after the soil treatments, rice seedlings were transplanted in a vermiculite-soil system and grown for 10 days. We measured pH and Eh, LMWOA, Fe and Cd contents in rice, and their fractions in the soils and vermiculite. Cadmium accumulation in rice declined in both soils upon the flooding and OM treatment. Iron dissolution in the paddy soil and its deposition in the rhizosphere significantly increased upon the OM addition, but the concentration of Fe plaque on the rice root significantly declined. Conversely, although Fe transformed into less active fractions in the saline soil, Fe accumulation on the surface and in the tissue of root was considerably enhanced. The secretion of LMWOA was remarkably induced when the OM was amended in the saline soil, but the same effect was not observed in the paddy soil. Reduction of Cd uptake by rice could be attributed to different factors in the two soils. For the paddy soil, the lowered Cd bioavailability was likely due to the competition of Fe and Cd for the binding sites on the vermiculite surface. For the saline soil, however, rice responded to the low Fe mobility through more LMWOA exudation and Fe plaque formation, and their increases could explain the decrease of rice Cd. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26260840/Do_soil_Fe_transformation_and_secretion_of_low_molecular_weight_organic_acids_affect_the_availability_of_Cd_to_rice DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -