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Cross-sectional relationships between dietary fat intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids in a Swedish cohort of 60-year-old men and women.
J Hum Nutr Diet 2016; 29(3):325-37JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The present study aimed to describe the relationship between self-reported dietary intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids (FAs) in a Swedish population of 60-year-old men and women.

METHODS

Cross-sectional data collected in 1997-1998 from 4232 individuals residing in Stockholm County were used. Five diet scores were created to reflect the intake of saturated fats in general, as well as fats from dairy, fish, processed meat and vegetable oils and margarines. Gas chromatography was used to assess 13 FAs in serum cholesterol esters. The association between each diet score and specific FAs was assessed by percentile differences (PD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile of each FA across levels of diet scores using quantile regression.

RESULTS

Fish intake was associated with high proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). For each point increase in fish score, the 50th PD in EPA and DHA was 32.78% (95% CI = 29.22% to 36.35%) and 10.63% (95% CI = 9.52% to 11.74%), respectively. Vegetable fat intake was associated with a high proportion of linoleic acid and total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a low proportion of total saturated fatty acids (SFA). The intake of saturated fats in general and dairy fat was slightly associated with specific SFA, although the intake of fat from meat was not.

CONCLUSIONS

In the present study population, using a rather simple dietary assessment method, the intake of fish and vegetable fats was clearly associated with serum PUFA, whereas foods rich in saturated fats in general showed a weak relationship with serum SFA. Our results may contribute to increased knowledge about underlying biology in diet-cardiovascular disease associations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Unit of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Unit of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.Unit of Biostatistics, Institutet of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Unit of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26264885

Citation

Laguzzi, F, et al. "Cross-sectional Relationships Between Dietary Fat Intake and Serum Cholesterol Fatty Acids in a Swedish Cohort of 60-year-old Men and Women." Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, vol. 29, no. 3, 2016, pp. 325-37.
Laguzzi F, Alsharari Z, Risérus U, et al. Cross-sectional relationships between dietary fat intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids in a Swedish cohort of 60-year-old men and women. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2016;29(3):325-37.
Laguzzi, F., Alsharari, Z., Risérus, U., Vikström, M., Sjögren, P., Gigante, B., ... Leander, K. (2016). Cross-sectional relationships between dietary fat intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids in a Swedish cohort of 60-year-old men and women. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, 29(3), pp. 325-37. doi:10.1111/jhn.12336.
Laguzzi F, et al. Cross-sectional Relationships Between Dietary Fat Intake and Serum Cholesterol Fatty Acids in a Swedish Cohort of 60-year-old Men and Women. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2016;29(3):325-37. PubMed PMID: 26264885.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cross-sectional relationships between dietary fat intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids in a Swedish cohort of 60-year-old men and women. AU - Laguzzi,F, AU - Alsharari,Z, AU - Risérus,U, AU - Vikström,M, AU - Sjögren,P, AU - Gigante,B, AU - Hellénius,M-L, AU - Cederholm,T, AU - Bottai,M, AU - de Faire,U, AU - Leander,K, Y1 - 2015/08/12/ PY - 2015/8/13/entrez PY - 2015/8/13/pubmed PY - 2017/1/5/medline KW - blood and serum fatty acids KW - dairy products KW - dietary fats KW - fish intake KW - margarines KW - vegetable oils SP - 325 EP - 37 JF - Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association JO - J Hum Nutr Diet VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to describe the relationship between self-reported dietary intake and serum cholesterol fatty acids (FAs) in a Swedish population of 60-year-old men and women. METHODS: Cross-sectional data collected in 1997-1998 from 4232 individuals residing in Stockholm County were used. Five diet scores were created to reflect the intake of saturated fats in general, as well as fats from dairy, fish, processed meat and vegetable oils and margarines. Gas chromatography was used to assess 13 FAs in serum cholesterol esters. The association between each diet score and specific FAs was assessed by percentile differences (PD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) at the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile of each FA across levels of diet scores using quantile regression. RESULTS: Fish intake was associated with high proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). For each point increase in fish score, the 50th PD in EPA and DHA was 32.78% (95% CI = 29.22% to 36.35%) and 10.63% (95% CI = 9.52% to 11.74%), respectively. Vegetable fat intake was associated with a high proportion of linoleic acid and total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a low proportion of total saturated fatty acids (SFA). The intake of saturated fats in general and dairy fat was slightly associated with specific SFA, although the intake of fat from meat was not. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study population, using a rather simple dietary assessment method, the intake of fish and vegetable fats was clearly associated with serum PUFA, whereas foods rich in saturated fats in general showed a weak relationship with serum SFA. Our results may contribute to increased knowledge about underlying biology in diet-cardiovascular disease associations. SN - 1365-277X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26264885/Cross_sectional_relationships_between_dietary_fat_intake_and_serum_cholesterol_fatty_acids_in_a_Swedish_cohort_of_60_year_old_men_and_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12336 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -