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Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis.
Neurol Sci. 2015 Dec; 36(12):2269-75.NS

Abstract

Although some studies have reported the associations between specific metal element intake and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), the associations between specific metal element intake such as iron intake and PD are still conflicted. We aimed to determine whether intake of iron, zinc, and copper increases/decreases the risk of PD. PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar were searched. We pooled the multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios using random effects. Study quality was evaluated by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Five studies including 126,507 individuals remained for inclusion, pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate dietary iron intake was 1.08 (95 % CI 0.61-1.93, P = 0.787), and for high dietary iron intake was (1.03, 95 % CI 0.83-1.30, P = 0.766), respectively. The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for the highest compared with the lowest dietary iron intake were 1.47 (95 % CI 1.17-1.85, P = 0.001) in western population and in males (RR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.01, P = 0.041). The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate or high intake of zinc, and copper were not statistically different (P > 0.05). PD increased by 18 % (RR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.02-1.37) for western population by every 10-mg/day increment in iron intake. Higher iron intake appears to be not associated with overall PD risk, but may be associated with risk of PD in western population. Sex may be a factor influencing PD risk for higher iron intake. However, further studies are still needed to confirm the sex-selective effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing, 400016, China. Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Department of Histology and Embryology, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, 154002, Heilongjiang Province, China.Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing, 400016, China. Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Key Laboratory of Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.Department of Neurology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400037, China.Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing, 400016, China. Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Key Laboratory of Medical Diagnostics, Ministry of Education, Chongqing, China. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.Institute of Neuroscience, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, 154002, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Neurology, Jiamusi University, Jiamusi, 154002, Heilongjiang Province, China.Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Xiepeng58@21cn.com. Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing, 400016, China. Xiepeng58@21cn.com. Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016, China. Xiepeng58@21cn.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26265293

Citation

Cheng, Pengfei, et al. "Dietary Intake of Iron, Zinc, Copper, and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: a Meta-analysis." Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 36, no. 12, 2015, pp. 2269-75.
Cheng P, Yu J, Huang W, et al. Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis. Neurol Sci. 2015;36(12):2269-75.
Cheng, P., Yu, J., Huang, W., Bai, S., Zhu, X., Qi, Z., Shao, W., & Xie, P. (2015). Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis. Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology, 36(12), 2269-75. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10072-015-2349-0
Cheng P, et al. Dietary Intake of Iron, Zinc, Copper, and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: a Meta-analysis. Neurol Sci. 2015;36(12):2269-75. PubMed PMID: 26265293.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis. AU - Cheng,Pengfei, AU - Yu,Jia, AU - Huang,Wen, AU - Bai,Shunjie, AU - Zhu,Xiaofeng, AU - Qi,Zhigang, AU - Shao,Weihua, AU - Xie,Peng, Y1 - 2015/08/12/ PY - 2015/06/23/received PY - 2015/07/20/accepted PY - 2015/8/13/entrez PY - 2015/8/13/pubmed PY - 2016/9/30/medline KW - Copper KW - Diet KW - Iron KW - Meta-analysis KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - Zinc SP - 2269 EP - 75 JF - Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology JO - Neurol Sci VL - 36 IS - 12 N2 - Although some studies have reported the associations between specific metal element intake and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), the associations between specific metal element intake such as iron intake and PD are still conflicted. We aimed to determine whether intake of iron, zinc, and copper increases/decreases the risk of PD. PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar were searched. We pooled the multivariate-adjusted relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios using random effects. Study quality was evaluated by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Five studies including 126,507 individuals remained for inclusion, pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate dietary iron intake was 1.08 (95 % CI 0.61-1.93, P = 0.787), and for high dietary iron intake was (1.03, 95 % CI 0.83-1.30, P = 0.766), respectively. The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for the highest compared with the lowest dietary iron intake were 1.47 (95 % CI 1.17-1.85, P = 0.001) in western population and in males (RR = 1.43, 95 % CI 1.01-2.01, P = 0.041). The pooled RRs of Parkinson's disease for moderate or high intake of zinc, and copper were not statistically different (P > 0.05). PD increased by 18 % (RR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.02-1.37) for western population by every 10-mg/day increment in iron intake. Higher iron intake appears to be not associated with overall PD risk, but may be associated with risk of PD in western population. Sex may be a factor influencing PD risk for higher iron intake. However, further studies are still needed to confirm the sex-selective effects. SN - 1590-3478 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26265293/Dietary_intake_of_iron_zinc_copper_and_risk_of_Parkinson's_disease:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10072-015-2349-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -