Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.
Neurotherapeutics. 2015 Oct; 12(4):788-92.N

Abstract

Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper.

Authors+Show Affiliations

New York Medical College, Metropolitan Hospital, 1901 First Ave. Suite 7C5, New York, NY, 10029, USA. Barbara.Koppel@nychhc.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26271953

Citation

Koppel, Barbara S.. "Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics." Neurotherapeutics : the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, vol. 12, no. 4, 2015, pp. 788-92.
Koppel BS. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics. Neurotherapeutics. 2015;12(4):788-92.
Koppel, B. S. (2015). Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics. Neurotherapeutics : the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics, 12(4), 788-92. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13311-015-0376-4
Koppel BS. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics. Neurotherapeutics. 2015;12(4):788-92. PubMed PMID: 26271953.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics. A1 - Koppel,Barbara S, PY - 2015/8/15/entrez PY - 2015/8/15/pubmed PY - 2016/7/23/medline KW - Cannabidiol KW - Cannabis KW - Chorea KW - Dyskinesias KW - Dystonia KW - Marijuana KW - THC KW - Tics SP - 788 EP - 92 JF - Neurotherapeutics : the journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics JO - Neurotherapeutics VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper. SN - 1878-7479 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26271953/Cannabis_in_the_Treatment_of_Dystonia_Dyskinesias_and_Tics_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13311-015-0376-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.