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Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: A Randomized Crossover Trial.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2016; 35(1):41-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Foods that enhance satiety can help consumers to resist environmental cues to eat and help adherence to calorie restriction. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of 2 oat-based breakfast cereals on appetite, satiety, and food intake.

METHODS

Forty-eight healthy individuals, 18 years of age or older, were enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects consumed isocaloric servings of either oatmeal or an oat-based ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEC) in random order at least a week apart. Visual analogue scales measuring appetite and satiety were completed before breakfast and throughout the morning. Lunch was served 4 hours after breakfast. The physicochemical properties of oat soluble fiber (β-glucan) were determined. Appetite and satiety responses were analyzed by area under the curve. Food intake and β-glucan properties were analyzed using t tests.

RESULTS

Oatmeal increased fullness (p = 0.001) and reduced hunger (p = 0.005), desire to eat (p = 0.001), and prospective intake (p = 0.006) more than the RTEC. Energy intake at lunch was lower after eating oatmeal compared to the RTEC (p = 0.012). Oatmeal had higher viscosity (p = 0.03), β-glucan content, molecular weight (p < 0.001), and radius of gyration (p < 0.001) than the RTEC.

CONCLUSIONS

Oatmeal suppresses appetite, increases satiety, and reduces energy intake compared to the RTEC. The physicochemical properties of β-glucan and sufficient hydration of oats are important factors affecting satiety and subsequent energy intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Louisiana State University , School of Nutrition and Food Sciences , Baton Rouge , Louisiana. b Pennington Biomedical Research Center , Louisiana State University System , Baton Rouge , Louisiana.b Pennington Biomedical Research Center , Louisiana State University System , Baton Rouge , Louisiana.b Pennington Biomedical Research Center , Louisiana State University System , Baton Rouge , Louisiana.b Pennington Biomedical Research Center , Louisiana State University System , Baton Rouge , Louisiana. c Pharmaceutical Product Development, LLC , Austin , Texas.d PepsiCo R&D Nutrition , Barrington , Illinois.d PepsiCo R&D Nutrition , Barrington , Illinois.d PepsiCo R&D Nutrition , Barrington , Illinois.d PepsiCo R&D Nutrition , Barrington , Illinois.b Pennington Biomedical Research Center , Louisiana State University System , Baton Rouge , Louisiana.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26273900

Citation

Rebello, Candida J., et al. "Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: a Randomized Crossover Trial." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 35, no. 1, 2016, pp. 41-9.
Rebello CJ, Johnson WD, Martin CK, et al. Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: A Randomized Crossover Trial. J Am Coll Nutr. 2016;35(1):41-9.
Rebello, C. J., Johnson, W. D., Martin, C. K., Han, H., Chu, Y. F., Bordenave, N., van Klinken, B. J., O'Shea, M., & Greenway, F. L. (2016). Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: A Randomized Crossover Trial. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 35(1), 41-9. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.2015.1032442
Rebello CJ, et al. Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: a Randomized Crossover Trial. J Am Coll Nutr. 2016;35(1):41-9. PubMed PMID: 26273900.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Instant Oatmeal Increases Satiety and Reduces Energy Intake Compared to a Ready-to-Eat Oat-Based Breakfast Cereal: A Randomized Crossover Trial. AU - Rebello,Candida J, AU - Johnson,William D, AU - Martin,Corby K, AU - Han,Hongmei, AU - Chu,Yi-Fang, AU - Bordenave,Nicolas, AU - van Klinken,B Jan Willem, AU - O'Shea,Marianne, AU - Greenway,Frank L, Y1 - 2015/08/14/ PY - 2015/8/15/entrez PY - 2015/8/15/pubmed PY - 2016/9/15/medline KW - energy intake KW - oats KW - physicochemical properties KW - satiety KW - β-glucan SP - 41 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Foods that enhance satiety can help consumers to resist environmental cues to eat and help adherence to calorie restriction. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of 2 oat-based breakfast cereals on appetite, satiety, and food intake. METHODS: Forty-eight healthy individuals, 18 years of age or older, were enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial. Subjects consumed isocaloric servings of either oatmeal or an oat-based ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEC) in random order at least a week apart. Visual analogue scales measuring appetite and satiety were completed before breakfast and throughout the morning. Lunch was served 4 hours after breakfast. The physicochemical properties of oat soluble fiber (β-glucan) were determined. Appetite and satiety responses were analyzed by area under the curve. Food intake and β-glucan properties were analyzed using t tests. RESULTS: Oatmeal increased fullness (p = 0.001) and reduced hunger (p = 0.005), desire to eat (p = 0.001), and prospective intake (p = 0.006) more than the RTEC. Energy intake at lunch was lower after eating oatmeal compared to the RTEC (p = 0.012). Oatmeal had higher viscosity (p = 0.03), β-glucan content, molecular weight (p < 0.001), and radius of gyration (p < 0.001) than the RTEC. CONCLUSIONS: Oatmeal suppresses appetite, increases satiety, and reduces energy intake compared to the RTEC. The physicochemical properties of β-glucan and sufficient hydration of oats are important factors affecting satiety and subsequent energy intake. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26273900/Instant_Oatmeal_Increases_Satiety_and_Reduces_Energy_Intake_Compared_to_a_Ready_to_Eat_Oat_Based_Breakfast_Cereal:_A_Randomized_Crossover_Trial_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -