Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

An event-level investigation of hangovers' relationship to age and drinking.
Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 2015; 23(5):314-323EC

Abstract

Animal and human data suggest that adolescents experience hangover effects that are distinct from adults. The present study used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods to examine the temporal relationships between drinking and hangovers, and how this varied by age and sex. We hypothesized that alcohol's dose-dependent effects on hangover severity are more pronounced among adolescents and young adults than older drinkers. We also explored whether greater hangover severity would lead to a lower likelihood and volume of alcohol use later the same day. Data were pooled from 4 studies of drinkers (N = 274; ages 15 to 66 years) who completed a 4- to 14-day (M = 7.46, SD = 1.13) EMA monitoring period. Each morning, participants recorded how much alcohol they consumed the day before and rated their hangover severity. Participants who consumed a greater quantity of alcohol the prior day reported more severe hangover symptoms; however, there was an interaction between drinking volume and age, such that hangover was more severe among younger drinkers, especially at higher drinking levels. More severe hangover symptoms did not predict the likelihood of drinking later that day; however, on drinking days, more severe hangover symptoms predicted lower quantities of alcohol use later that day. This event-level effect did not vary as a function of age. Study outcomes did not vary by sex. Our findings suggest that younger drinkers experience more severe hangovers, and that greater hangover results in lighter drinking later that same day regardless of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center.Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26280593

Citation

Huntley, Geoffrey, et al. "An Event-level Investigation of Hangovers' Relationship to Age and Drinking." Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 23, no. 5, 2015, pp. 314-323.
Huntley G, Treloar H, Blanchard A, et al. An event-level investigation of hangovers' relationship to age and drinking. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015;23(5):314-323.
Huntley, G., Treloar, H., Blanchard, A., Monti, P. M., Carey, K. B., Rohsenow, D. J., & Miranda, R. (2015). An event-level investigation of hangovers' relationship to age and drinking. Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, 23(5), pp. 314-323. doi:10.1037/pha0000037.
Huntley G, et al. An Event-level Investigation of Hangovers' Relationship to Age and Drinking. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2015;23(5):314-323. PubMed PMID: 26280593.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An event-level investigation of hangovers' relationship to age and drinking. AU - Huntley,Geoffrey, AU - Treloar,Hayley, AU - Blanchard,Alexander, AU - Monti,Peter M, AU - Carey,Kate B, AU - Rohsenow,Damaris J, AU - Miranda,Robert, Y1 - 2015/08/17/ PY - 2015/8/18/entrez PY - 2015/8/19/pubmed PY - 2016/6/18/medline SP - 314 EP - 323 JF - Experimental and clinical psychopharmacology JO - Exp Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - Animal and human data suggest that adolescents experience hangover effects that are distinct from adults. The present study used ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods to examine the temporal relationships between drinking and hangovers, and how this varied by age and sex. We hypothesized that alcohol's dose-dependent effects on hangover severity are more pronounced among adolescents and young adults than older drinkers. We also explored whether greater hangover severity would lead to a lower likelihood and volume of alcohol use later the same day. Data were pooled from 4 studies of drinkers (N = 274; ages 15 to 66 years) who completed a 4- to 14-day (M = 7.46, SD = 1.13) EMA monitoring period. Each morning, participants recorded how much alcohol they consumed the day before and rated their hangover severity. Participants who consumed a greater quantity of alcohol the prior day reported more severe hangover symptoms; however, there was an interaction between drinking volume and age, such that hangover was more severe among younger drinkers, especially at higher drinking levels. More severe hangover symptoms did not predict the likelihood of drinking later that day; however, on drinking days, more severe hangover symptoms predicted lower quantities of alcohol use later that day. This event-level effect did not vary as a function of age. Study outcomes did not vary by sex. Our findings suggest that younger drinkers experience more severe hangovers, and that greater hangover results in lighter drinking later that same day regardless of age. SN - 1936-2293 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26280593/An_event_level_investigation_of_hangovers'_relationship_to_age_and_drinking_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/pha/23/5/314 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -