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The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort.
J Nutr. 2015 Oct; 145(10):2355-61.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Metabolic syndrome (MetS), comprising high waist circumference, blood pressure, glycemia, and triglycerides, and lower HDL cholesterol could in part be prevented by adequate nutrition. Nutrient profiling systems could be useful public health tools to help consumers make healthier food choices. An individual dietary index (DI) based on nutrient profiling of foods consumed could characterize dietary patterns in relation to the onset of MetS.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate the association between the Food Standards Agency (FSA) Nutrient Profiling System (NPS) DI and the onset of MetS in a middle-aged French cohort.

METHODS

Participants from the SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants cohort (SU.VI.MAX, n = 3741) were included in the present study. The FSA NPS DI was computed by using dietary data from 24 h records at inclusion. MetS was identified at baseline and at year 13 of follow-up with the use of self-reported medication, data from clinical investigations, and biological measurements. A prospective association between the FSA NPS DI (in quartiles and continuous) and the onset of MetS was investigated by using logistic regression.

RESULTS

Poorer diets identified with the use of the FSA NPS DI were significantly associated with a higher risk of developing MetS (OR for poorer vs. healthier FSA NPS DI: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.89; P-trend across quartiles = 0.02). The FSA NPS DI was significantly associated with the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) components of MetS (difference between healthier vs. poorer FSA NPS DI: 2.16 mm Hg for SBP and 1.5 mm Hg for DBP, P-trend across quartiles = 0.02).

CONCLUSION

The FSA NPS DI was prospectively associated with the onset of MetS in a middle-aged French population. The application of NPSs in public health initiatives may help the population make healthier food choices, which might reduce the risk of developing MetS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and Public Health Department, Avicenne Hospital (AP-HP), Bobigny, France c.julia@uren.smbh.univ-paris13.fr.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and Public Health Department, Avicenne Hospital (AP-HP), Bobigny, France.Paris 13 University, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Research Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité (CRESS), Inserm (U1153), INRA (U1125), CNAM, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, Bobigny, France; and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26290007

Citation

Julia, Chantal, et al. "The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 10, 2015, pp. 2355-61.
Julia C, Fézeu LK, Ducrot P, et al. The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort. J Nutr. 2015;145(10):2355-61.
Julia, C., Fézeu, L. K., Ducrot, P., Méjean, C., Péneau, S., Touvier, M., Hercberg, S., & Kesse-Guyot, E. (2015). The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort. The Journal of Nutrition, 145(10), 2355-61. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.115.213629
Julia C, et al. The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort. J Nutr. 2015;145(10):2355-61. PubMed PMID: 26290007.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Nutrient Profile of Foods Consumed Using the British Food Standards Agency Nutrient Profiling System Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort. AU - Julia,Chantal, AU - Fézeu,Léopold K, AU - Ducrot,Pauline, AU - Méjean,Caroline, AU - Péneau,Sandrine, AU - Touvier,Mathilde, AU - Hercberg,Serge, AU - Kesse-Guyot,Emmanuelle, Y1 - 2015/08/19/ PY - 2015/03/24/received PY - 2015/07/07/accepted PY - 2015/8/21/entrez PY - 2015/8/21/pubmed PY - 2016/1/14/medline KW - a priori dietary score KW - cohort study KW - dietary patterns KW - metabolic syndrome KW - nutrient profiling system SP - 2355 EP - 61 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 145 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Metabolic syndrome (MetS), comprising high waist circumference, blood pressure, glycemia, and triglycerides, and lower HDL cholesterol could in part be prevented by adequate nutrition. Nutrient profiling systems could be useful public health tools to help consumers make healthier food choices. An individual dietary index (DI) based on nutrient profiling of foods consumed could characterize dietary patterns in relation to the onset of MetS. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate the association between the Food Standards Agency (FSA) Nutrient Profiling System (NPS) DI and the onset of MetS in a middle-aged French cohort. METHODS: Participants from the SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants cohort (SU.VI.MAX, n = 3741) were included in the present study. The FSA NPS DI was computed by using dietary data from 24 h records at inclusion. MetS was identified at baseline and at year 13 of follow-up with the use of self-reported medication, data from clinical investigations, and biological measurements. A prospective association between the FSA NPS DI (in quartiles and continuous) and the onset of MetS was investigated by using logistic regression. RESULTS: Poorer diets identified with the use of the FSA NPS DI were significantly associated with a higher risk of developing MetS (OR for poorer vs. healthier FSA NPS DI: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.89; P-trend across quartiles = 0.02). The FSA NPS DI was significantly associated with the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) components of MetS (difference between healthier vs. poorer FSA NPS DI: 2.16 mm Hg for SBP and 1.5 mm Hg for DBP, P-trend across quartiles = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The FSA NPS DI was prospectively associated with the onset of MetS in a middle-aged French population. The application of NPSs in public health initiatives may help the population make healthier food choices, which might reduce the risk of developing MetS. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26290007/The_Nutrient_Profile_of_Foods_Consumed_Using_the_British_Food_Standards_Agency_Nutrient_Profiling_System_Is_Associated_with_Metabolic_Syndrome_in_the_SU_VI_MAX_Cohort_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.115.213629 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -