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Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years.
Osteoporos Int. 2016 Jan; 27(1):249-55.OI

Abstract

This study examines the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk in 75-year-old women followed for 10 years. Smoking increased fracture risk, especially for vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other fracture types.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this study was to examine effects of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk.

METHODS

This prospective observational population-based study followed 1033 women during 10 years from age 75. Data regarding smoking were collected at age 75. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for fracture were calculated using competing risks proportional hazards regression.

RESULTS

Both former smokers and current smokers had an increased risk for any fracture (HR 1.30; 1.03-1.66, and HR 1.32; 1.01-1.73, respectively) and any osteoporotic fracture (hip, proximal humerus, distal radius, vertebra) (HR 1.31; 1.01-1.70 and HR 1.49; 1.11-1.98, respectively) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fractures (HR 2.23; 1.35-3.70), and current smokers had an increased risk for vertebral fractures (HR 2.30; 1.57-3.38) compared to non-smokers. After adjustment for weight, previous fractures, alcohol habits, bone mineral density (BMD), use of corticoids, vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and previous falls, former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fracture (HR 2.07; 1.19-3.57) and current smokers had an increased risk for osteoporotic (HR 1.47; 1.05-2.05) and vertebral fractures (HR 2.50; 1.58-3.95) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had a decreased risk for vertebral fractures, but not for other types of fractures, compared to current smokers.

CONCLUSIONS

Smoking increased the risk for fracture among elderly women, especially vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other types of fractures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Orthopedics, K54, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, 141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Orthopedics, K54, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, 141 86, Stockholm, Sweden.Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Science Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Department of Orthopedics, Skåne University Hospital, 205 02, Malmö, Sweden.Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Orthopedics, K54, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, 141 86, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.gerdhem@karolinska.se.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26302684

Citation

Thorin, M H., et al. "Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Fracture Risk in Elderly Women Followed for 10 Years." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 27, no. 1, 2016, pp. 249-55.
Thorin MH, Wihlborg A, Åkesson K, et al. Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years. Osteoporos Int. 2016;27(1):249-55.
Thorin, M. H., Wihlborg, A., Åkesson, K., & Gerdhem, P. (2016). Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 27(1), 249-55. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3290-z
Thorin MH, et al. Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Fracture Risk in Elderly Women Followed for 10 Years. Osteoporos Int. 2016;27(1):249-55. PubMed PMID: 26302684.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking, smoking cessation, and fracture risk in elderly women followed for 10 years. AU - Thorin,M H, AU - Wihlborg,A, AU - Åkesson,K, AU - Gerdhem,P, Y1 - 2015/08/25/ PY - 2015/04/21/received PY - 2015/08/11/accepted PY - 2015/8/26/entrez PY - 2015/8/26/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline KW - Elderly KW - Fracture risk KW - Smoking KW - Smoking cessation KW - Women SP - 249 EP - 55 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 27 IS - 1 N2 - UNLABELLED: This study examines the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk in 75-year-old women followed for 10 years. Smoking increased fracture risk, especially for vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other fracture types. INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to examine effects of smoking and smoking cessation on fracture risk. METHODS: This prospective observational population-based study followed 1033 women during 10 years from age 75. Data regarding smoking were collected at age 75. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals for fracture were calculated using competing risks proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Both former smokers and current smokers had an increased risk for any fracture (HR 1.30; 1.03-1.66, and HR 1.32; 1.01-1.73, respectively) and any osteoporotic fracture (hip, proximal humerus, distal radius, vertebra) (HR 1.31; 1.01-1.70 and HR 1.49; 1.11-1.98, respectively) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fractures (HR 2.23; 1.35-3.70), and current smokers had an increased risk for vertebral fractures (HR 2.30; 1.57-3.38) compared to non-smokers. After adjustment for weight, previous fractures, alcohol habits, bone mineral density (BMD), use of corticoids, vitamin D, bisphosphonates, and previous falls, former smokers had an increased risk for proximal humerus fracture (HR 2.07; 1.19-3.57) and current smokers had an increased risk for osteoporotic (HR 1.47; 1.05-2.05) and vertebral fractures (HR 2.50; 1.58-3.95) compared to non-smokers. Former smokers had a decreased risk for vertebral fractures, but not for other types of fractures, compared to current smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking increased the risk for fracture among elderly women, especially vertebral fractures. Smoking cessation decreased the risk for vertebral fractures but not for other types of fractures. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26302684/Smoking_smoking_cessation_and_fracture_risk_in_elderly_women_followed_for_10_years_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3290-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -