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Bifidobacteria grown on human milk oligosaccharides downregulate the expression of inflammation-related genes in Caco-2 cells.
BMC Microbiol. 2015 Aug 25; 15:172.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Breastfed human infants are predominantly colonized by bifidobacteria that thrive on human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Two predominant species of bifidobacteria in infant feces are Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve) and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), both of which include avid HMO-consumer strains. Our laboratory has previously shown that B. infantis, when grown on HMO, increases adhesion to intestinal cells and increases the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of carbon source-glucose, lactose, or HMO-on the ability of B. breve and B. infantis to adhere to and affect the transcription of intestinal epithelial cells on a genome-wide basis.

RESULTS

HMO-grown B. infantis had higher percent binding to Caco-2 cell monolayers compared to B. infantis grown on glucose or lactose. B. breve had low adhesive ability regardless of carbon source. Despite differential binding ability, both HMO-grown strains significantly differentially affected the Caco-2 transcriptome compared to their glucose or lactose grown controls. HMO-grown B. breve and B. infantis both downregulated genes in Caco-2 cells associated with chemokine activity.

CONCLUSION

The choice of carbon source affects the interaction of bifidobacteria with intestinal epithelial cells. HMO-grown bifidobacteria reduce markers of inflammation, compared to glucose or lactose-grown bifidobacteria. In the future, the design of preventative or therapeutic probiotic supplements may need to include appropriately chosen prebiotics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Basic Veterinary Sciences, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, 20400, Sri Lanka. saumyawicks@gmail.com. Foods for Health Institute University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. saumyawicks@gmail.com. Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. saumyawicks@gmail.com.Foods for Health Institute University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. alline.roberta.pacheco@gmail.com. Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. alline.roberta.pacheco@gmail.com. Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. alline.roberta.pacheco@gmail.com.Foods for Health Institute University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. dglemay@ucdavis.edu. Genome Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. dglemay@ucdavis.edu.Foods for Health Institute University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu. Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu. Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, 95616, USA. damills@ucdavis.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26303932

Citation

Wickramasinghe, Saumya, et al. "Bifidobacteria Grown On Human Milk Oligosaccharides Downregulate the Expression of Inflammation-related Genes in Caco-2 Cells." BMC Microbiology, vol. 15, 2015, p. 172.
Wickramasinghe S, Pacheco AR, Lemay DG, et al. Bifidobacteria grown on human milk oligosaccharides downregulate the expression of inflammation-related genes in Caco-2 cells. BMC Microbiol. 2015;15:172.
Wickramasinghe, S., Pacheco, A. R., Lemay, D. G., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Bifidobacteria grown on human milk oligosaccharides downregulate the expression of inflammation-related genes in Caco-2 cells. BMC Microbiology, 15, 172. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-015-0508-3
Wickramasinghe S, et al. Bifidobacteria Grown On Human Milk Oligosaccharides Downregulate the Expression of Inflammation-related Genes in Caco-2 Cells. BMC Microbiol. 2015 Aug 25;15:172. PubMed PMID: 26303932.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bifidobacteria grown on human milk oligosaccharides downregulate the expression of inflammation-related genes in Caco-2 cells. AU - Wickramasinghe,Saumya, AU - Pacheco,Alline R, AU - Lemay,Danielle G, AU - Mills,David A, Y1 - 2015/08/25/ PY - 2014/12/12/received PY - 2015/08/13/accepted PY - 2015/8/26/entrez PY - 2015/8/26/pubmed PY - 2016/3/22/medline SP - 172 EP - 172 JF - BMC microbiology JO - BMC Microbiol VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Breastfed human infants are predominantly colonized by bifidobacteria that thrive on human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Two predominant species of bifidobacteria in infant feces are Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve) and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), both of which include avid HMO-consumer strains. Our laboratory has previously shown that B. infantis, when grown on HMO, increases adhesion to intestinal cells and increases the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of carbon source-glucose, lactose, or HMO-on the ability of B. breve and B. infantis to adhere to and affect the transcription of intestinal epithelial cells on a genome-wide basis. RESULTS: HMO-grown B. infantis had higher percent binding to Caco-2 cell monolayers compared to B. infantis grown on glucose or lactose. B. breve had low adhesive ability regardless of carbon source. Despite differential binding ability, both HMO-grown strains significantly differentially affected the Caco-2 transcriptome compared to their glucose or lactose grown controls. HMO-grown B. breve and B. infantis both downregulated genes in Caco-2 cells associated with chemokine activity. CONCLUSION: The choice of carbon source affects the interaction of bifidobacteria with intestinal epithelial cells. HMO-grown bifidobacteria reduce markers of inflammation, compared to glucose or lactose-grown bifidobacteria. In the future, the design of preventative or therapeutic probiotic supplements may need to include appropriately chosen prebiotics. SN - 1471-2180 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26303932/Bifidobacteria_grown_on_human_milk_oligosaccharides_downregulate_the_expression_of_inflammation_related_genes_in_Caco_2_cells_ L2 - https://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12866-015-0508-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -