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Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States-Mexico Border.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Oct; 93(4):747-51.AJ

Abstract

We evaluated the use of federal public health intervention tools known as the Do Not Board and Border Lookout (BL) for detecting and referring infectious or potentially infectious land border travelers with tuberculosis (TB) back to treatment. We used data about the issuance of BL from April 2007 to September 2013 to examine demographics and TB laboratory results for persons on the list (N = 66) and time on the list before being located and achieving noninfectious status. The majority of case-patients were Hispanic and male, with a median age of 39 years. Most were citizens of the United States or Mexico, and 30.3% were undocumented migrants. One-fifth had multidrug-resistant TB. Nearly two-thirds of case-patients were located and treated as a result of being placed on the list. However, 25.8% of case-patients, primarily undocumented migrants, remain lost to follow-up and remain on the list. For this highly mobile patient population, the use of this novel federal travel intervention tool facilitated the detection and treatment of infectious TB cases that were lost to follow-up.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley carla.desisto@gmail.com.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley.Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26304917

Citation

DeSisto, Carla, et al. "Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control On the United States-Mexico Border." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 93, no. 4, 2015, pp. 747-51.
DeSisto C, Broussard K, Escobedo M, et al. Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States-Mexico Border. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;93(4):747-51.
DeSisto, C., Broussard, K., Escobedo, M., Borntrager, D., Alvarado-Ramy, F., & Waterman, S. (2015). Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States-Mexico Border. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 93(4), 747-51. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0300
DeSisto C, et al. Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control On the United States-Mexico Border. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;93(4):747-51. PubMed PMID: 26304917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Border Lookout: Enhancing Tuberculosis Control on the United States-Mexico Border. AU - DeSisto,Carla, AU - Broussard,Kelly, AU - Escobedo,Miguel, AU - Borntrager,Denise, AU - Alvarado-Ramy,Francisco, AU - Waterman,Stephen, Y1 - 2015/08/24/ PY - 2015/04/17/received PY - 2015/06/01/accepted PY - 2015/8/26/entrez PY - 2015/8/26/pubmed PY - 2016/2/3/medline SP - 747 EP - 51 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 93 IS - 4 N2 - We evaluated the use of federal public health intervention tools known as the Do Not Board and Border Lookout (BL) for detecting and referring infectious or potentially infectious land border travelers with tuberculosis (TB) back to treatment. We used data about the issuance of BL from April 2007 to September 2013 to examine demographics and TB laboratory results for persons on the list (N = 66) and time on the list before being located and achieving noninfectious status. The majority of case-patients were Hispanic and male, with a median age of 39 years. Most were citizens of the United States or Mexico, and 30.3% were undocumented migrants. One-fifth had multidrug-resistant TB. Nearly two-thirds of case-patients were located and treated as a result of being placed on the list. However, 25.8% of case-patients, primarily undocumented migrants, remain lost to follow-up and remain on the list. For this highly mobile patient population, the use of this novel federal travel intervention tool facilitated the detection and treatment of infectious TB cases that were lost to follow-up. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26304917/Border_Lookout:_Enhancing_Tuberculosis_Control_on_the_United_States_Mexico_Border_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0300 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -