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Chemical Composition and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils from Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon citrinus from Western Himalayas.
PLoS One 2015; 10(8):e0133823Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Plant-based traditional system of medicine continues to play an important role in healthcare. In order to find new potent source of bioactive molecules, we studied the cytotoxic activity of the essential oils from the flowers and leaves of Callistemon citrinus. This is the first report on anticancer potential of essential oils of C. citrinus.

METHODS

Cytotoxicity of essential oil was evaluated using sulfo-rhodamine B (SRB) assay against human lung carcinoma (A549), rat glioma (C-6), human colon cancer (Colo-205) and human cervical cancer (SiHa) cells. Apoptosis induction was evaluated by caspase-3/7 activity which was further confirmed by western blotting. Percentage cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin V based dead cell assay followed by DNA content as cell cycle analysis against A549 and C-6 cells. While 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to check the toxicity against normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the immunomodulatory activity on mouse splenocytes was evaluated using SRB assay.

RESULTS

The GC and GC-MS analysis of these essential oils revealed high content of α-pinene (32.3%), limonene (13.1%) and α-terpineol (14.6%) in leaf sample, whereas the flower oil was dominated by 1,8-cineole (36.6%) followed by α-pinene (29.7%). The leaf oil contained higher amount of monoterpene hydrocarbons (52.1%) and sesquiterpenoids (14%) as compared to flower oil (44.6% and 1.2%, respectively). However, the flower oil was predominant in oxygenated monoterpenes (43.5%). Although both leaf and flower oils showed highest cytotoxicity on A549 cells (61.4%±5.0 and 66.7%±2.2, respectively), only 100 μg/mL flower oil was significantly active against C-6 cells (69.1%±3.1). Interestingly, no toxicity was recorded on normal cells.

CONCLUSION

Higher concentration of 1,8-cineole and/or synergistic effect of the overall composition were probably responsible for the efficacy of flower and leaf oils against the tested cells. These oils may form potential source of natural anti-cancer compounds and play important role in human health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Regulatory Research Center, Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (CSIR-IHBT), Post Box No. 6, Palampur-176 061, Himachal Pradesh, India.Regulatory Research Center, Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (CSIR-IHBT), Post Box No. 6, Palampur-176 061, Himachal Pradesh, India.Natural Plant Products Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (CSIR-IHBT), Post Box No. 6, Palampur-176 061, Himachal Pradesh, India.Regulatory Research Center, Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (CSIR-IHBT), Post Box No. 6, Palampur-176 061, Himachal Pradesh, India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26308916

Citation

Kumar, Dharmesh, et al. "Chemical Composition and in Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils From Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon Citrinus From Western Himalayas." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 8, 2015, pp. e0133823.
Kumar D, Sukapaka M, Babu GD, et al. Chemical Composition and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils from Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon citrinus from Western Himalayas. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(8):e0133823.
Kumar, D., Sukapaka, M., Babu, G. D., & Padwad, Y. (2015). Chemical Composition and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils from Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon citrinus from Western Himalayas. PloS One, 10(8), pp. e0133823. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0133823.
Kumar D, et al. Chemical Composition and in Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils From Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon Citrinus From Western Himalayas. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(8):e0133823. PubMed PMID: 26308916.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chemical Composition and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Essential Oils from Leaves and Flowers of Callistemon citrinus from Western Himalayas. AU - Kumar,Dharmesh, AU - Sukapaka,Mahesh, AU - Babu,G D Kiran, AU - Padwad,Yogendra, Y1 - 2015/08/26/ PY - 2014/07/01/received PY - 2015/07/02/accepted PY - 2015/8/27/entrez PY - 2015/8/27/pubmed PY - 2016/5/19/medline SP - e0133823 EP - e0133823 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 10 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Plant-based traditional system of medicine continues to play an important role in healthcare. In order to find new potent source of bioactive molecules, we studied the cytotoxic activity of the essential oils from the flowers and leaves of Callistemon citrinus. This is the first report on anticancer potential of essential oils of C. citrinus. METHODS: Cytotoxicity of essential oil was evaluated using sulfo-rhodamine B (SRB) assay against human lung carcinoma (A549), rat glioma (C-6), human colon cancer (Colo-205) and human cervical cancer (SiHa) cells. Apoptosis induction was evaluated by caspase-3/7 activity which was further confirmed by western blotting. Percentage cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin V based dead cell assay followed by DNA content as cell cycle analysis against A549 and C-6 cells. While 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to check the toxicity against normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the immunomodulatory activity on mouse splenocytes was evaluated using SRB assay. RESULTS: The GC and GC-MS analysis of these essential oils revealed high content of α-pinene (32.3%), limonene (13.1%) and α-terpineol (14.6%) in leaf sample, whereas the flower oil was dominated by 1,8-cineole (36.6%) followed by α-pinene (29.7%). The leaf oil contained higher amount of monoterpene hydrocarbons (52.1%) and sesquiterpenoids (14%) as compared to flower oil (44.6% and 1.2%, respectively). However, the flower oil was predominant in oxygenated monoterpenes (43.5%). Although both leaf and flower oils showed highest cytotoxicity on A549 cells (61.4%±5.0 and 66.7%±2.2, respectively), only 100 μg/mL flower oil was significantly active against C-6 cells (69.1%±3.1). Interestingly, no toxicity was recorded on normal cells. CONCLUSION: Higher concentration of 1,8-cineole and/or synergistic effect of the overall composition were probably responsible for the efficacy of flower and leaf oils against the tested cells. These oils may form potential source of natural anti-cancer compounds and play important role in human health. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26308916/Chemical_Composition_and_In_Vitro_Cytotoxicity_of_Essential_Oils_from_Leaves_and_Flowers_of_Callistemon_citrinus_from_Western_Himalayas_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0133823 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -