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Risk of familial classical Hodgkin lymphoma by relationship, histology, age, and sex: a joint study from five Nordic countries.

Abstract

We aimed to provide the familial risk of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) by relationship, histology, age at diagnosis, and sex. A cohort of 57,475 first-degree relatives of 13,922 HL patients diagnosed between 1955 and 2009 in 5 European countries was observed for HL incidence. The overall lifetime cumulative risk (CR) of HL in first-degree relatives of a patient with HL was 0.6%, which represents a threefold (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-3.9) increased risk over the general population risk. The risk in siblings (6.0-fold; 95% CI, 4.8- to 7.4-fold) was significantly higher than in parents and/or children (2.1-fold; 95% CI, 1.6- to 2.6-fold). Very high lifetime risk of HL was found for those with multiple affected first-degree relatives (13-fold; 95% CI, 2.8- to 39-fold) and for same-sex twins (57-fold; 95% CI, 21- to 125-fold). We found high familial risks between some concordant histologic subtypes of HL such as lymphocyte-rich (81-fold; 95% CI, 30- to 177-fold) and nodular sclerosis (4.6-fold; 95% CI, 2.9- to 7.0-fold) and also between some discordant subtypes. The familial risk in sisters (9.4-fold; 95% CI, 5.9- to 14-fold) was higher than in brothers (4.5-fold; 95% CI, 2.9- to 6.7-fold) or unlike-sex siblings (5.9-fold; 95% CI, 4.3- to 8.1-fold). The lifetime risk of HL was higher when first-degree relatives were diagnosed at early ages (before age 30 years). This study provides tangible absolute risk estimates for relatives of HL patients, which can be used as a sex-, age-, and family history-based risk calculator for classical HL by oncologists and genetic counselors.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany;

    ,

    Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany;

    ,

    Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Helsinki, Finland; School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland;

    ,

    Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark;

    ,

    Icelandic Cancer Registry, Reykjavik, Iceland; Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland;

    ,

    Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and.

    ,

    Norwegian Cancer Registry, Oslo, Norway.

    Division of Molecular Genetic Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and.

    Source

    Blood 126:17 2015 Oct 22 pg 1990-5

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Age of Onset
    Aged
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Hodgkin Disease
    Humans
    Incidence
    Infant
    Infant, Newborn
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Neoplasm Staging
    Prognosis
    Registries
    Risk Assessment
    Scandinavian and Nordic Countries
    Sex Factors
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26311361

    Citation

    Kharazmi, Elham, et al. "Risk of Familial Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma By Relationship, Histology, Age, and Sex: a Joint Study From Five Nordic Countries." Blood, vol. 126, no. 17, 2015, pp. 1990-5.
    Kharazmi E, Fallah M, Pukkala E, et al. Risk of familial classical Hodgkin lymphoma by relationship, histology, age, and sex: a joint study from five Nordic countries. Blood. 2015;126(17):1990-5.
    Kharazmi, E., Fallah, M., Pukkala, E., Olsen, J. H., Tryggvadottir, L., Sundquist, K., ... Hemminki, K. (2015). Risk of familial classical Hodgkin lymphoma by relationship, histology, age, and sex: a joint study from five Nordic countries. Blood, 126(17), pp. 1990-5. doi:10.1182/blood-2015-04-639781.
    Kharazmi E, et al. Risk of Familial Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma By Relationship, Histology, Age, and Sex: a Joint Study From Five Nordic Countries. Blood. 2015 Oct 22;126(17):1990-5. PubMed PMID: 26311361.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Risk of familial classical Hodgkin lymphoma by relationship, histology, age, and sex: a joint study from five Nordic countries. AU - Kharazmi,Elham, AU - Fallah,Mahdi, AU - Pukkala,Eero, AU - Olsen,Jörgen H, AU - Tryggvadottir,Laufey, AU - Sundquist,Kristina, AU - Tretli,Steinar, AU - Hemminki,Kari, Y1 - 2015/08/26/ PY - 2015/04/10/received PY - 2015/08/14/accepted PY - 2015/8/28/entrez PY - 2015/8/28/pubmed PY - 2016/2/13/medline SP - 1990 EP - 5 JF - Blood JO - Blood VL - 126 IS - 17 N2 - We aimed to provide the familial risk of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) by relationship, histology, age at diagnosis, and sex. A cohort of 57,475 first-degree relatives of 13,922 HL patients diagnosed between 1955 and 2009 in 5 European countries was observed for HL incidence. The overall lifetime cumulative risk (CR) of HL in first-degree relatives of a patient with HL was 0.6%, which represents a threefold (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.8-3.9) increased risk over the general population risk. The risk in siblings (6.0-fold; 95% CI, 4.8- to 7.4-fold) was significantly higher than in parents and/or children (2.1-fold; 95% CI, 1.6- to 2.6-fold). Very high lifetime risk of HL was found for those with multiple affected first-degree relatives (13-fold; 95% CI, 2.8- to 39-fold) and for same-sex twins (57-fold; 95% CI, 21- to 125-fold). We found high familial risks between some concordant histologic subtypes of HL such as lymphocyte-rich (81-fold; 95% CI, 30- to 177-fold) and nodular sclerosis (4.6-fold; 95% CI, 2.9- to 7.0-fold) and also between some discordant subtypes. The familial risk in sisters (9.4-fold; 95% CI, 5.9- to 14-fold) was higher than in brothers (4.5-fold; 95% CI, 2.9- to 6.7-fold) or unlike-sex siblings (5.9-fold; 95% CI, 4.3- to 8.1-fold). The lifetime risk of HL was higher when first-degree relatives were diagnosed at early ages (before age 30 years). This study provides tangible absolute risk estimates for relatives of HL patients, which can be used as a sex-, age-, and family history-based risk calculator for classical HL by oncologists and genetic counselors. SN - 1528-0020 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26311361/full_citation L2 - http://www.bloodjournal.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=26311361 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -