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Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up.
Clin Interv Aging. 2015; 10:1335-49.CI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive-physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training.

METHODS

Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1) virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE), 2) treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY), or 3) treadmill walking (PHYS). Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated.

RESULTS

Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive-physical programs were found in two dimensions of executive function. "Shifting attention" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE/MEMORY versus PHYS (F[2, 68] =1.95, trend P=0.075, r=0.17); and "working memory" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE versus MEMORY (F[1, 136] =2.71, trend P=0.051, R (2)=0.006). Performance improvements in executive functions, long-term visual memory (episodic memory), and processing speed were maintained at follow-up in all groups.

CONCLUSION

Particular executive functions benefit from simultaneous cognitive-physical training compared to exclusively physical multicomponent training. Cognitive-physical training programs may counteract widespread cognitive impairments in the elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland.Department of Gerontopsychology and Gerontology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland ; University Research Priority Program "Dynamics of Healthy Aging", University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland.Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, Schlieren, Switzerland ; Center for Gerontology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.Institute of Human Movement Sciences and Sport, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland ; CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands ; Centre for Evidence Based Physiotherapy, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26316729

Citation

Eggenberger, Patrick, et al. "Does Multicomponent Physical Exercise With Simultaneous Cognitive Training Boost Cognitive Performance in Older Adults? a 6-month Randomized Controlled Trial With a 1-year Follow-up." Clinical Interventions in Aging, vol. 10, 2015, pp. 1335-49.
Eggenberger P, Schumacher V, Angst M, et al. Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:1335-49.
Eggenberger, P., Schumacher, V., Angst, M., Theill, N., & de Bruin, E. D. (2015). Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 10, 1335-49. https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S87732
Eggenberger P, et al. Does Multicomponent Physical Exercise With Simultaneous Cognitive Training Boost Cognitive Performance in Older Adults? a 6-month Randomized Controlled Trial With a 1-year Follow-up. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10:1335-49. PubMed PMID: 26316729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training boost cognitive performance in older adults? A 6-month randomized controlled trial with a 1-year follow-up. AU - Eggenberger,Patrick, AU - Schumacher,Vera, AU - Angst,Marius, AU - Theill,Nathan, AU - de Bruin,Eling D, Y1 - 2015/08/17/ PY - 2015/8/29/entrez PY - 2015/9/1/pubmed PY - 2016/4/20/medline KW - cognitive impairment KW - dance KW - elderly KW - executive function KW - transfer KW - video game SP - 1335 EP - 49 JF - Clinical interventions in aging JO - Clin Interv Aging VL - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a health problem that concerns almost every second elderly person. Physical and cognitive training have differential positive effects on cognition, but have been rarely applied in combination. This study evaluates synergistic effects of multicomponent physical exercise complemented with novel simultaneous cognitive training on cognition in older adults. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive-physical components would add training specific cognitive benefits compared to exclusively physical training. METHODS: Seniors, older than 70 years, without cognitive impairment, were randomly assigned to either: 1) virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE), 2) treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY), or 3) treadmill walking (PHYS). Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline, after 3 and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were calculated. RESULTS: Eighty-nine participants were randomized to the three groups initially, 71 completed the training, while 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. Advantages of the simultaneous cognitive-physical programs were found in two dimensions of executive function. "Shifting attention" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE/MEMORY versus PHYS (F[2, 68] =1.95, trend P=0.075, r=0.17); and "working memory" showed a time×intervention interaction in favor of DANCE versus MEMORY (F[1, 136] =2.71, trend P=0.051, R (2)=0.006). Performance improvements in executive functions, long-term visual memory (episodic memory), and processing speed were maintained at follow-up in all groups. CONCLUSION: Particular executive functions benefit from simultaneous cognitive-physical training compared to exclusively physical multicomponent training. Cognitive-physical training programs may counteract widespread cognitive impairments in the elderly. SN - 1178-1998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26316729/Does_multicomponent_physical_exercise_with_simultaneous_cognitive_training_boost_cognitive_performance_in_older_adults_A_6_month_randomized_controlled_trial_with_a_1_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S87732 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -