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Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(8):e0137058.Plos

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Combinations of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Taiwan. We analyzed the usage and frequency of CHPs prescribed for patients with IHD.

METHODS

A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study was conducted, 53531 patients from a random sample of one million in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2000 to 2010 were enrolled. Descriptive statistics, the multiple logistic regression method and Poisson regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) for utilization of CHPs.

RESULTS

The mean age of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) nonusers was significantly higher than that of TCM users. Zhi-Gan-Cao-Tang (24.85%) was the most commonly prescribed formula CHPs, followed by Xue-Fu-Zhu-Yu-Tang (16.53%) and Sheng-Mai-San (16.00%). The most commonly prescribed single CHPs were Dan Shen (29.30%), Yu Jin (7.44%), and Ge Gen (6.03%). After multivariate adjustment, patients with IHD younger than 29 years had 2.62 times higher odds to use TCM than those 60 years or older. Residents living in Central Taiwan, having hyperlipidemia or cardiac dysrhythmias also have higher odds to use TCM. On the contrary, those who were males, who had diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely to use TCM.

CONCLUSIONS

Zhi-Gan-Cao-Tang and Dan Shen are the most commonly prescribed CHPs for IHD in Taiwan. Our results should be taken into account by physicians when devising individualized therapy for IHD. Further large-scale, randomized clinical trials are warranted in order to determine the effectiveness and safety of these herbal medicines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan; School of Chinese Medicine for Post Baccalaureate, I-Shou University, No.1, Sec. 1, Syuecheng Rd., Dashu District, Kaohsiung City 84001, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan; Fooyin University College of Nursing, No.151, Chinhsueh Rd., Ta-liao Dist., Kaohsiung City 831, Taiwan; Kaohsiung Medical University College of Medicine, No.100, Shihcyuan 1st Rd., Sanmin Dist., Kaohsiung City 807, Taiwan.Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University Hospital, No.2 Yude Road, Taichung 40447, Taiwan; College of Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan.Graduate Institute of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan; Department of Healthcare Administration, College of Health Science, Asia University, No.500, Lioufeng Rd., Wufeng, Taichung 41354, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan.Department of Chinese Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, No.123, Dapi Rd., Niaosong Dist., Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26322893

Citation

Hung, Yu-Chiang, et al. "Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 8, 2015, pp. e0137058.
Hung YC, Tseng YJ, Hu WL, et al. Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study. PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0137058.
Hung, Y. C., Tseng, Y. J., Hu, W. L., Chen, H. J., Li, T. C., Tsai, P. Y., Chen, H. P., Huang, M. H., & Su, F. Y. (2015). Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study. PloS One, 10(8), e0137058. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137058
Hung YC, et al. Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study. PLoS One. 2015;10(8):e0137058. PubMed PMID: 26322893.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Demographic and Prescribing Patterns of Chinese Herbal Products for Individualized Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease in Taiwan: Population-Based Study. AU - Hung,Yu-Chiang, AU - Tseng,Ying-Jung, AU - Hu,Wen-Long, AU - Chen,Hsuan-Ju, AU - Li,Tsai-Chung, AU - Tsai,Pei-Yuan, AU - Chen,Hsin-Ping, AU - Huang,Meng-Hsuan, AU - Su,Fang-Yen, Y1 - 2015/08/31/ PY - 2014/08/10/received PY - 2015/08/13/accepted PY - 2015/9/1/entrez PY - 2015/9/1/pubmed PY - 2016/5/18/medline SP - e0137058 EP - e0137058 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 10 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Combinations of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) are widely used for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Taiwan. We analyzed the usage and frequency of CHPs prescribed for patients with IHD. METHODS: A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study was conducted, 53531 patients from a random sample of one million in the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2000 to 2010 were enrolled. Descriptive statistics, the multiple logistic regression method and Poisson regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and adjusted risk ratios (aRRs) for utilization of CHPs. RESULTS: The mean age of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) nonusers was significantly higher than that of TCM users. Zhi-Gan-Cao-Tang (24.85%) was the most commonly prescribed formula CHPs, followed by Xue-Fu-Zhu-Yu-Tang (16.53%) and Sheng-Mai-San (16.00%). The most commonly prescribed single CHPs were Dan Shen (29.30%), Yu Jin (7.44%), and Ge Gen (6.03%). After multivariate adjustment, patients with IHD younger than 29 years had 2.62 times higher odds to use TCM than those 60 years or older. Residents living in Central Taiwan, having hyperlipidemia or cardiac dysrhythmias also have higher odds to use TCM. On the contrary, those who were males, who had diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension, stroke, myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely to use TCM. CONCLUSIONS: Zhi-Gan-Cao-Tang and Dan Shen are the most commonly prescribed CHPs for IHD in Taiwan. Our results should be taken into account by physicians when devising individualized therapy for IHD. Further large-scale, randomized clinical trials are warranted in order to determine the effectiveness and safety of these herbal medicines. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26322893/Demographic_and_Prescribing_Patterns_of_Chinese_Herbal_Products_for_Individualized_Therapy_for_Ischemic_Heart_Disease_in_Taiwan:_Population_Based_Study_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0137058 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -