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Microplastics in the Ocean.
Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2015 Oct; 69(3):265-8.AE

Abstract

Since their ubiquity in the ocean and marine organisms was first revealed, global concern about microplastics has grown considerably. The North Pacific Ocean and the adjacent marginal seas have high levels of microplastic contamination compared with the global average. This special issue on microplastics was organized by the North Pacific Marine Science Organization to share information on microplastic pollution in the North Pacific region. The special issue highlights high levels of contamination in the North Pacific both on shorelines and at the sea surface. Particularly high levels of contamination were reported on the western and southern coasts of Korea. Sources, including sewage discharge, aquaculture, and shipyards, were implicated. With the direction and energy of surface winds and currents have an important influence on shoreline patterns of distribution. The special issue also demonstrates potential for ingestion of microplastic by small planktonic organisms at the base of the food chain. A wide range of chemicals are associated with plastic debris and concerns are expressed about the potential for these chemicals to transfer to biota upon ingestion. As an introduction to the topic, this paper provides a brief background on microplastic contamination, highlights some key research gaps, and summarizes findings from the articles published in this issue.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oil and POPs Research Group, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Geoje, 656-834, South Korea. wjshim@kiost.ac. Department of Marine Environmental Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-320, South Korea. wjshim@kiost.ac.Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre (MBERC), School of Marine Science and Engineering, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26329498

Citation

Shim, Won Joon, and Richard C. Thomposon. "Microplastics in the Ocean." Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, vol. 69, no. 3, 2015, pp. 265-8.
Shim WJ, Thomposon RC. Microplastics in the Ocean. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2015;69(3):265-8.
Shim, W. J., & Thomposon, R. C. (2015). Microplastics in the Ocean. Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, 69(3), 265-8. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00244-015-0216-x
Shim WJ, Thomposon RC. Microplastics in the Ocean. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol. 2015;69(3):265-8. PubMed PMID: 26329498.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microplastics in the Ocean. AU - Shim,Won Joon, AU - Thomposon,Richard C, Y1 - 2015/09/02/ PY - 2015/07/30/received PY - 2015/08/06/accepted PY - 2015/9/3/entrez PY - 2015/9/4/pubmed PY - 2016/3/19/medline SP - 265 EP - 8 JF - Archives of environmental contamination and toxicology JO - Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. VL - 69 IS - 3 N2 - Since their ubiquity in the ocean and marine organisms was first revealed, global concern about microplastics has grown considerably. The North Pacific Ocean and the adjacent marginal seas have high levels of microplastic contamination compared with the global average. This special issue on microplastics was organized by the North Pacific Marine Science Organization to share information on microplastic pollution in the North Pacific region. The special issue highlights high levels of contamination in the North Pacific both on shorelines and at the sea surface. Particularly high levels of contamination were reported on the western and southern coasts of Korea. Sources, including sewage discharge, aquaculture, and shipyards, were implicated. With the direction and energy of surface winds and currents have an important influence on shoreline patterns of distribution. The special issue also demonstrates potential for ingestion of microplastic by small planktonic organisms at the base of the food chain. A wide range of chemicals are associated with plastic debris and concerns are expressed about the potential for these chemicals to transfer to biota upon ingestion. As an introduction to the topic, this paper provides a brief background on microplastic contamination, highlights some key research gaps, and summarizes findings from the articles published in this issue. SN - 1432-0703 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26329498/Microplastics_in_the_Ocean_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00244-015-0216-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -