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Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: An Evidence Update.
Ont Health Technol Assess Ser 2014; 14(13):1-43OH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with knee pain as a result of osteoarthritis or degenerative meniscal injury may seek treatment through arthroscopic surgery. How effective arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy is for relieving pain and improving patients' functional outcomes is uncertain.

OBJECTIVES

To conduct an evidence update of an evidence-based analysis (EBA) conducted in 2005 to determine if arthroscopic debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee or for meniscal injury from degenerative causes improve patient outcomes.

DATA SOURCES

A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, and all EBM databases, for studies published from January 1, 2005, to February 4, 2014.

REVIEW METHODS

A systematic review of the literature was conducted, limited to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effectiveness of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy. Quality assessment of the body of literature was conducted using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE).

RESULTS

A total of 8 RCTs were identified, 2 from the original EBA plus 6 that were published since that time. The studies included patients with a range of indications for treatment and severity of osteoarthritis. Moderate-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus placebo (e.g., sham surgery). Low-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus usual care (e.g., physical therapy).

LIMITATIONS

Heterogeneity across the study populations, interventions, and reported measures limited the ability to calculate a summary effect estimate; however, all studies demonstrated consistency in their findings.

CONCLUSIONS

The evidence does not show the superiority of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or with meniscal injury from degenerative causes.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26330895

Citation

Evidence Development and Standards Branch, Health Quality Ontario. "Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: an Evidence Update." Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, vol. 14, no. 13, 2014, pp. 1-43.
Evidence Development and Standards Branch, Health Quality Ontario. Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: An Evidence Update. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2014;14(13):1-43.
Evidence Development and Standards Branch, Health Quality Ontario. (2014). Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: An Evidence Update. Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series, 14(13), pp. 1-43.
Evidence Development and Standards Branch, Health Quality Ontario. Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: an Evidence Update. Ont Health Technol Assess Ser. 2014;14(13):1-43. PubMed PMID: 26330895.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Arthroscopic Debridement of the Knee: An Evidence Update. A1 - ,, Y1 - 2014/11/01/ PY - 2015/9/3/entrez PY - 2014/1/1/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline SP - 1 EP - 43 JF - Ontario health technology assessment series JO - Ont Health Technol Assess Ser VL - 14 IS - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with knee pain as a result of osteoarthritis or degenerative meniscal injury may seek treatment through arthroscopic surgery. How effective arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy is for relieving pain and improving patients' functional outcomes is uncertain. OBJECTIVES: To conduct an evidence update of an evidence-based analysis (EBA) conducted in 2005 to determine if arthroscopic debridement for osteoarthritis of the knee or for meniscal injury from degenerative causes improve patient outcomes. DATA SOURCES: A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, and all EBM databases, for studies published from January 1, 2005, to February 4, 2014. REVIEW METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted, limited to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examined the effectiveness of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy. Quality assessment of the body of literature was conducted using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE). RESULTS: A total of 8 RCTs were identified, 2 from the original EBA plus 6 that were published since that time. The studies included patients with a range of indications for treatment and severity of osteoarthritis. Moderate-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus placebo (e.g., sham surgery). Low-quality evidence showed no statistically significant difference in pain or functional status between patients who received arthroscopic treatment versus usual care (e.g., physical therapy). LIMITATIONS: Heterogeneity across the study populations, interventions, and reported measures limited the ability to calculate a summary effect estimate; however, all studies demonstrated consistency in their findings. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence does not show the superiority of arthroscopic debridement with or without meniscectomy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or with meniscal injury from degenerative causes. SN - 1915-7398 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26330895/Arthroscopic_Debridement_of_the_Knee:_An_Evidence_Update_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/26330895/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -