Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparative transcriptomics reveals key differences in the response to milk oligosaccharides of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria.
Sci Rep. 2015 Sep 04; 5:13517.SR

Abstract

Breast milk enhances the predominance of Bifidobacterium species in the infant gut, probably due to its large concentration of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Here we screened infant-gut isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium bifidum using individual HMO, and compared the global transcriptomes of representative isolates on major HMO by RNA-seq. While B. infantis displayed homogeneous HMO-utilization patterns, B. bifidum were more diverse and some strains did not use fucosyllactose (FL) or sialyllactose (SL). Transcriptomes of B. bifidum SC555 and B. infantis ATCC 15697 showed that utilization of pooled HMO is similar to neutral HMO, while transcriptomes for growth on FL were more similar to lactose than HMO in B. bifidum. Genes linked to HMO-utilization were upregulated by neutral HMO and SL, but not by FL in both species. In contrast, FL induced the expression of alternative gene clusters in B. infantis. Results also suggest that B. bifidum SC555 does not utilize fucose or sialic acid from HMO. Surprisingly, expression of orthologous genes differed between both bifidobacteria even when grown on identical substrates. This study highlights two major strategies found in Bifidobacterium species to process HMO, and presents detailed information on the close relationship between HMO and infant-gut bifidobacteria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Viticulture &Enology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Department of Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering, School of Engineering, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago, Chile. Programa ASIS, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago, Chile.Department of Viticulture &Enology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States.Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Genome Center, University of California, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States.Department of Viticulture &Enology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003.Food Science &Technology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States.Department of Viticulture &Enology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Food Science &Technology, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States. Foods for Health Institute, One Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26337101

Citation

Garrido, Daniel, et al. "Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Key Differences in the Response to Milk Oligosaccharides of Infant Gut-associated Bifidobacteria." Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 2015, p. 13517.
Garrido D, Ruiz-Moyano S, Lemay DG, et al. Comparative transcriptomics reveals key differences in the response to milk oligosaccharides of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria. Sci Rep. 2015;5:13517.
Garrido, D., Ruiz-Moyano, S., Lemay, D. G., Sela, D. A., German, J. B., & Mills, D. A. (2015). Comparative transcriptomics reveals key differences in the response to milk oligosaccharides of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria. Scientific Reports, 5, 13517. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep13517
Garrido D, et al. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Key Differences in the Response to Milk Oligosaccharides of Infant Gut-associated Bifidobacteria. Sci Rep. 2015 Sep 4;5:13517. PubMed PMID: 26337101.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative transcriptomics reveals key differences in the response to milk oligosaccharides of infant gut-associated bifidobacteria. AU - Garrido,Daniel, AU - Ruiz-Moyano,Santiago, AU - Lemay,Danielle G, AU - Sela,David A, AU - German,J Bruce, AU - Mills,David A, Y1 - 2015/09/04/ PY - 2015/02/19/received PY - 2015/05/27/accepted PY - 2015/9/5/entrez PY - 2015/9/5/pubmed PY - 2016/7/28/medline SP - 13517 EP - 13517 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 5 N2 - Breast milk enhances the predominance of Bifidobacterium species in the infant gut, probably due to its large concentration of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Here we screened infant-gut isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium bifidum using individual HMO, and compared the global transcriptomes of representative isolates on major HMO by RNA-seq. While B. infantis displayed homogeneous HMO-utilization patterns, B. bifidum were more diverse and some strains did not use fucosyllactose (FL) or sialyllactose (SL). Transcriptomes of B. bifidum SC555 and B. infantis ATCC 15697 showed that utilization of pooled HMO is similar to neutral HMO, while transcriptomes for growth on FL were more similar to lactose than HMO in B. bifidum. Genes linked to HMO-utilization were upregulated by neutral HMO and SL, but not by FL in both species. In contrast, FL induced the expression of alternative gene clusters in B. infantis. Results also suggest that B. bifidum SC555 does not utilize fucose or sialic acid from HMO. Surprisingly, expression of orthologous genes differed between both bifidobacteria even when grown on identical substrates. This study highlights two major strategies found in Bifidobacterium species to process HMO, and presents detailed information on the close relationship between HMO and infant-gut bifidobacteria. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26337101/Comparative_transcriptomics_reveals_key_differences_in_the_response_to_milk_oligosaccharides_of_infant_gut_associated_bifidobacteria_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -