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Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: An Overview of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract

There is uncertainty in relation to the effect of alcohol consumption on the incidence of dementia and cognitive decline. This review critically evaluated published systematic reviews on the epidemiology of alcohol consumption and the risk of dementia or cognitive decline. MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO were searched from inception to February 2014. Systematic reviews of longitudinal observational studies were considered. Two reviewers independently completed the 11-item Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool to assess the quality. We identified three moderate quality systematic reviews (AMSTAR score 4-6) that included a total of 45 unique studies. Two of the systematic reviews encompassed a meta-analysis. Light to moderate drinking may decrease the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (pooled risk ratio [RR] 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.86) and dementia (RR 0.74; 95%CI 0.61-0.91) whereas heavy to excessive drinking does not affect the risk (RR 0.92; 95%CI 0.59-1.45 and RR 1.04; 95%CI 0.69-1.56, respectively). One systematic review identified two studies that reported a link between alcohol consumption and the development of AD. No systematic review categorised former drinkers separately from lifetime abstainers in their analysis. Definitions of alcohol consumption, light to moderate drinking and heavy-excessive drinking varied and drinking patterns were not considered. Moderate quality (AMSTAR score 4-6) systematic reviews indicate that light to moderate alcohol consumption may protect against AD and dementia. However, the importance of drinking patterns and specific beverages remain unknown. There is insufficient evidence to suggest abstainers should initiate alcohol consumption to protect against dementia.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Monash University, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, 381 Royal Parade, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia. jenni.ilomaki@monash.edu.

    , ,

    Source

    Current clinical pharmacology 10:3 2015 pg 204-12

    MeSH

    Alcohol Drinking
    Alzheimer Disease
    Cognition Disorders
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Dementia
    Humans
    Longitudinal Studies
    Observational Studies as Topic
    Review Literature as Topic
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    26338173

    Citation

    Ilomaki, Jenni, et al. "Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: an Overview of Systematic Reviews." Current Clinical Pharmacology, vol. 10, no. 3, 2015, pp. 204-12.
    Ilomaki J, Jokanovic N, Tan EC, et al. Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: An Overview of Systematic Reviews. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2015;10(3):204-12.
    Ilomaki, J., Jokanovic, N., Tan, E. C., & Lonnroos, E. (2015). Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: An Overview of Systematic Reviews. Current Clinical Pharmacology, 10(3), pp. 204-12.
    Ilomaki J, et al. Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: an Overview of Systematic Reviews. Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2015;10(3):204-12. PubMed PMID: 26338173.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol Consumption, Dementia and Cognitive Decline: An Overview of Systematic Reviews. AU - Ilomaki,Jenni, AU - Jokanovic,Natali, AU - Tan,Edwin C K, AU - Lonnroos,Eija, PY - 2015/05/13/received PY - 2015/06/06/revised PY - 2015/07/17/accepted PY - 2015/9/5/entrez PY - 2015/9/5/pubmed PY - 2016/6/25/medline SP - 204 EP - 12 JF - Current clinical pharmacology JO - Curr Clin Pharmacol VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - There is uncertainty in relation to the effect of alcohol consumption on the incidence of dementia and cognitive decline. This review critically evaluated published systematic reviews on the epidemiology of alcohol consumption and the risk of dementia or cognitive decline. MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO were searched from inception to February 2014. Systematic reviews of longitudinal observational studies were considered. Two reviewers independently completed the 11-item Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool to assess the quality. We identified three moderate quality systematic reviews (AMSTAR score 4-6) that included a total of 45 unique studies. Two of the systematic reviews encompassed a meta-analysis. Light to moderate drinking may decrease the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (pooled risk ratio [RR] 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.86) and dementia (RR 0.74; 95%CI 0.61-0.91) whereas heavy to excessive drinking does not affect the risk (RR 0.92; 95%CI 0.59-1.45 and RR 1.04; 95%CI 0.69-1.56, respectively). One systematic review identified two studies that reported a link between alcohol consumption and the development of AD. No systematic review categorised former drinkers separately from lifetime abstainers in their analysis. Definitions of alcohol consumption, light to moderate drinking and heavy-excessive drinking varied and drinking patterns were not considered. Moderate quality (AMSTAR score 4-6) systematic reviews indicate that light to moderate alcohol consumption may protect against AD and dementia. However, the importance of drinking patterns and specific beverages remain unknown. There is insufficient evidence to suggest abstainers should initiate alcohol consumption to protect against dementia. SN - 2212-3938 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26338173/Alcohol_Consumption_Dementia_and_Cognitive_Decline:_An_Overview_of_Systematic_Reviews_ L2 - http://www.eurekaselect.com/134183/article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -