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Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research.
Yale J Biol Med 2015; 88(3):303-8YJ

Abstract

The aim of this brief analytical review is to highlight and disentangle research dilemmas in the field of exercise addiction. Research examining exercise addiction is primarily based on self-reports, obtained by questionnaires (incorporating psychometrically validated instruments), and interviews, which provide a range of risk scores rather than diagnosis. Survey methodology indicates that the prevalence of risk for exercise addiction is approximately 3 percent among the exercising population. Several studies have reported a substantially greater prevalence of risk for exercise addiction in elite athletes compared to those who exercise for leisure. However, elite athletes may assign a different interpretation to the assessment tools than leisure exercisers. The present paper examines the: 1) discrepancies in the classification of exercise addiction; 2) inconsistent reporting of exercise addiction prevalence; and 3) varied interpretation of exercise addiction diagnostic tools. It is concluded that there is the need for consistent terminology, to follow-up results derived from exercise addiction instruments with interviews, and to follow a theory-driven rationale in this area of research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Health Promotion and Sport Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.Psychology Division, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, United Kingdom.Department of Physical Education, Sport & Human Movement, Autonomous University of Madrid, Campus Cantoblanco, Madrid, Spain.Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26339214

Citation

Szabo, Attila, et al. "Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research." The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, vol. 88, no. 3, 2015, pp. 303-8.
Szabo A, Griffiths MD, de La Vega Marcos R, et al. Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research. Yale J Biol Med. 2015;88(3):303-8.
Szabo, A., Griffiths, M. D., de La Vega Marcos, R., Mervó, B., & Demetrovics, Z. (2015). Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research. The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 88(3), pp. 303-8.
Szabo A, et al. Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research. Yale J Biol Med. 2015;88(3):303-8. PubMed PMID: 26339214.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methodological and Conceptual Limitations in Exercise Addiction Research. AU - Szabo,Attila, AU - Griffiths,Mark D, AU - de La Vega Marcos,Ricardo, AU - Mervó,Barbara, AU - Demetrovics,Zsolt, Y1 - 2015/09/03/ PY - 2015/9/5/entrez PY - 2015/9/5/pubmed PY - 2016/6/2/medline KW - athlete KW - behavioral addiction KW - commitment to exercise KW - exerciser KW - methodology SP - 303 EP - 8 JF - The Yale journal of biology and medicine JO - Yale J Biol Med VL - 88 IS - 3 N2 - The aim of this brief analytical review is to highlight and disentangle research dilemmas in the field of exercise addiction. Research examining exercise addiction is primarily based on self-reports, obtained by questionnaires (incorporating psychometrically validated instruments), and interviews, which provide a range of risk scores rather than diagnosis. Survey methodology indicates that the prevalence of risk for exercise addiction is approximately 3 percent among the exercising population. Several studies have reported a substantially greater prevalence of risk for exercise addiction in elite athletes compared to those who exercise for leisure. However, elite athletes may assign a different interpretation to the assessment tools than leisure exercisers. The present paper examines the: 1) discrepancies in the classification of exercise addiction; 2) inconsistent reporting of exercise addiction prevalence; and 3) varied interpretation of exercise addiction diagnostic tools. It is concluded that there is the need for consistent terminology, to follow-up results derived from exercise addiction instruments with interviews, and to follow a theory-driven rationale in this area of research. SN - 1551-4056 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26339214/Methodological_and_Conceptual_Limitations_in_Exercise_Addiction_Research_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/26339214/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -