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TiO2 photocatalysis of naproxen: effect of the water matrix, anions and diclofenac on degradation rates.
Chemosphere. 2015 Nov; 139:579-88.C

Abstract

The TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) naproxen (NPX) has been studied using a laboratory-scale photoreactor equipped with a medium pressure mercury lamp. UV/TiO2 photocatalysis proved highly efficient in the elimination of NPX from a variety of water matrices, including distilled water, unfiltered river water and drinking water, although the rate of reaction was not always proportional to TiO2 concentration. However, the NPX degradation rate, which follows first-order kinetics, was appreciably reduced in river water spiked with phosphate and chloride ions, a dual anion system. Addition of chloride into drinking water enhanced the TiO2-photocatalysed degradation rate. Competitive degradation studies also revealed that the NPX degradation was greatly reduced in the presence of increased concentrations of another API, diclofenac (DCF). This was established by (i) the extent of mineralization, as determined by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content, and (ii) the formation of intermediate NPX by-products, identified using liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization (positive and negative mode) mass spectrometry techniques. This study demonstrates that competition for active sites (anions or DCF) and formation of multiple photoproducts resulting from synergistic interactions (between both APIs) are key to the TiO2-photocatalysed NPX degradation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Discipline of Chemistry, College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia. Electronic address: kdevagi@frst.unimas.my.Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), Biomolecular Analysis Facility, Townsville, Qld 4810, Australia.Pharmacy, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.Discipline of Chemistry, College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia. Electronic address: michael.oelgemoeller@jcu.edu.au.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26340372

Citation

Kanakaraju, Devagi, et al. "TiO2 Photocatalysis of Naproxen: Effect of the Water Matrix, Anions and Diclofenac On Degradation Rates." Chemosphere, vol. 139, 2015, pp. 579-88.
Kanakaraju D, Motti CA, Glass BD, et al. TiO2 photocatalysis of naproxen: effect of the water matrix, anions and diclofenac on degradation rates. Chemosphere. 2015;139:579-88.
Kanakaraju, D., Motti, C. A., Glass, B. D., & Oelgemöller, M. (2015). TiO2 photocatalysis of naproxen: effect of the water matrix, anions and diclofenac on degradation rates. Chemosphere, 139, 579-88. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.07.070
Kanakaraju D, et al. TiO2 Photocatalysis of Naproxen: Effect of the Water Matrix, Anions and Diclofenac On Degradation Rates. Chemosphere. 2015;139:579-88. PubMed PMID: 26340372.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - TiO2 photocatalysis of naproxen: effect of the water matrix, anions and diclofenac on degradation rates. AU - Kanakaraju,Devagi, AU - Motti,Cherie A, AU - Glass,Beverley D, AU - Oelgemöller,Michael, Y1 - 2015/09/01/ PY - 2015/03/16/received PY - 2015/07/23/revised PY - 2015/07/24/accepted PY - 2015/9/5/entrez PY - 2015/9/5/pubmed PY - 2016/5/7/medline KW - Advanced oxidation process KW - Anions KW - Diclofenac KW - Naproxen KW - Pharmaceuticals KW - Photocatalysis SP - 579 EP - 88 JF - Chemosphere JO - Chemosphere VL - 139 N2 - The TiO2 photocatalytic degradation of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) naproxen (NPX) has been studied using a laboratory-scale photoreactor equipped with a medium pressure mercury lamp. UV/TiO2 photocatalysis proved highly efficient in the elimination of NPX from a variety of water matrices, including distilled water, unfiltered river water and drinking water, although the rate of reaction was not always proportional to TiO2 concentration. However, the NPX degradation rate, which follows first-order kinetics, was appreciably reduced in river water spiked with phosphate and chloride ions, a dual anion system. Addition of chloride into drinking water enhanced the TiO2-photocatalysed degradation rate. Competitive degradation studies also revealed that the NPX degradation was greatly reduced in the presence of increased concentrations of another API, diclofenac (DCF). This was established by (i) the extent of mineralization, as determined by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content, and (ii) the formation of intermediate NPX by-products, identified using liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization (positive and negative mode) mass spectrometry techniques. This study demonstrates that competition for active sites (anions or DCF) and formation of multiple photoproducts resulting from synergistic interactions (between both APIs) are key to the TiO2-photocatalysed NPX degradation. SN - 1879-1298 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26340372/TiO2_photocatalysis_of_naproxen:_effect_of_the_water_matrix_anions_and_diclofenac_on_degradation_rates_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0045-6535(15)00791-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -