Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Epicuticular wax on cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) leaves does not constitute the cuticular transpiration barrier.
Planta 2016; 243(1):65-81P

Abstract

MAIN CONCLUSION

Epicuticular wax of cherry laurel does not contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which must be established by intracuticular wax. Barrier properties of cuticles are established by cuticular wax deposited on the outer surface of the cuticle (epicuticular wax) and in the cutin polymer (intracuticular wax). It is still an open question to what extent epi- and/or intracuticular waxes contribute to the formation of the transpiration barrier. Epicuticular wax was mechanically removed from the surfaces of isolated cuticles and intact leaf disks of cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.) by stripping with different polymers (collodion, cellulose acetate and gum arabic). Scanning electron microscopy showed that two consecutive treatments with all three polymers were sufficient to completely remove epicuticular wax since wax platelets disappeared and cuticle surfaces appeared smooth. Waxes in consecutive polymer strips and wax remaining in the cuticle after treatment with the polymers were determined by gas chromatography. This confirmed that two treatments of the polymers were sufficient for selectively removing epicuticular wax. Water permeability of isolated cuticles and cuticles covering intact leaf disks was measured using (3)H-labelled water before and after selectively removing epicuticular wax. Cellulose acetate and its solvent acetone led to a significant increase of cuticular permeability, indicating that the organic solvent acetone affected the cuticular transpiration barrier. However, permeability did not change after two subsequent treatments with collodion and gum arabic or after treatment with the corresponding solvents (diethyl ether:ethanol or water). Thus, in the case of P. laurocerasus the epicuticular wax does not significantly contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which evidently must be established by the intracuticular wax.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ecophysiology, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Botany, University of Bonn, Kirschallee 1, 53115, Bonn, Germany.Department of Ecophysiology, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Botany, University of Bonn, Kirschallee 1, 53115, Bonn, Germany. lukas.schreiber@uni-bonn.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26341347

Citation

Zeisler, Viktoria, and Lukas Schreiber. "Epicuticular Wax On Cherry Laurel (Prunus Laurocerasus) Leaves Does Not Constitute the Cuticular Transpiration Barrier." Planta, vol. 243, no. 1, 2016, pp. 65-81.
Zeisler V, Schreiber L. Epicuticular wax on cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) leaves does not constitute the cuticular transpiration barrier. Planta. 2016;243(1):65-81.
Zeisler, V., & Schreiber, L. (2016). Epicuticular wax on cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) leaves does not constitute the cuticular transpiration barrier. Planta, 243(1), pp. 65-81. doi:10.1007/s00425-015-2397-y.
Zeisler V, Schreiber L. Epicuticular Wax On Cherry Laurel (Prunus Laurocerasus) Leaves Does Not Constitute the Cuticular Transpiration Barrier. Planta. 2016;243(1):65-81. PubMed PMID: 26341347.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epicuticular wax on cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) leaves does not constitute the cuticular transpiration barrier. AU - Zeisler,Viktoria, AU - Schreiber,Lukas, Y1 - 2015/09/04/ PY - 2015/03/30/received PY - 2015/08/27/accepted PY - 2015/9/6/entrez PY - 2015/9/6/pubmed PY - 2016/11/8/medline KW - Cuticular transpiration KW - Cuticular wax KW - Leaf surface KW - Plant cuticle KW - Wax chemistry SP - 65 EP - 81 JF - Planta JO - Planta VL - 243 IS - 1 N2 - MAIN CONCLUSION: Epicuticular wax of cherry laurel does not contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which must be established by intracuticular wax. Barrier properties of cuticles are established by cuticular wax deposited on the outer surface of the cuticle (epicuticular wax) and in the cutin polymer (intracuticular wax). It is still an open question to what extent epi- and/or intracuticular waxes contribute to the formation of the transpiration barrier. Epicuticular wax was mechanically removed from the surfaces of isolated cuticles and intact leaf disks of cherry laurel (Prunus laurocerasus L.) by stripping with different polymers (collodion, cellulose acetate and gum arabic). Scanning electron microscopy showed that two consecutive treatments with all three polymers were sufficient to completely remove epicuticular wax since wax platelets disappeared and cuticle surfaces appeared smooth. Waxes in consecutive polymer strips and wax remaining in the cuticle after treatment with the polymers were determined by gas chromatography. This confirmed that two treatments of the polymers were sufficient for selectively removing epicuticular wax. Water permeability of isolated cuticles and cuticles covering intact leaf disks was measured using (3)H-labelled water before and after selectively removing epicuticular wax. Cellulose acetate and its solvent acetone led to a significant increase of cuticular permeability, indicating that the organic solvent acetone affected the cuticular transpiration barrier. However, permeability did not change after two subsequent treatments with collodion and gum arabic or after treatment with the corresponding solvents (diethyl ether:ethanol or water). Thus, in the case of P. laurocerasus the epicuticular wax does not significantly contribute to the formation of the cuticular transpiration barrier, which evidently must be established by the intracuticular wax. SN - 1432-2048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26341347/Epicuticular_wax_on_cherry_laurel__Prunus_laurocerasus__leaves_does_not_constitute_the_cuticular_transpiration_barrier_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-015-2397-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -