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DRD2 and SLC6A3 moderate impact of maternal depressive symptoms on infant cortisol.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015 Dec; 62:243-51.P

Abstract

Both maternal depressive symptoms and infants' dopamine-related genetic characteristics have been linked to infants' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning. This study investigated the interactive influence of maternal depressive symptoms and infant DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes on infant cortisol reactivity; whether this interaction reflects diathesis-stress or differential susceptibility; and whether this interaction influences the flexibility of the infant cortisol response across challenges known to exert differential effects on infant cortisol reactivity. A community sample of 314 mother-infant dyads participated in toy frustration (age 16 months) and maternal separation (age 17 months) challenges, and salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, +20, and +40min. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II at infant age 16 months. Infant buccal cells were collected at both time points for genotyping. DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptomatology and infant cortisol reactivity in a diathesis-stress manner in the context of toy frustration, and in a differential susceptibility manner in the context of maternal separation. Higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms predicted reduced cortisol flexibility across challenges for infants with at least one A1 allele of DRD2 and infants with the 10/10 genotype of SLC6A3. Results suggest that maternal depressive symptomatology is related to infants' cortisol reactivity and to the flexibility of that reactivity across psychosocial challenges, but this relation is dependent on the infant's genetic characteristics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, M5B 2K3, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250College Street, M5T 1R8, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Psychiatric Neurogenics Section, Center for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, M5T 1R8, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, 100 West 5th, L8N 3K7, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, 250College Street, M5T 1R8, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Psychiatric Neurogenics Section, Center for Addiction and Mental Health, 250 College Street, M5T 1R8, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, M5B 2K3, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Neurology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, M4N 3M5, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Neurology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, M4N 3M5, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, M5B 2K3, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: atkinson@psych.ryerson.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26342565

Citation

Ludmer, Jaclyn A., et al. "DRD2 and SLC6A3 Moderate Impact of Maternal Depressive Symptoms On Infant Cortisol." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 62, 2015, pp. 243-51.
Ludmer JA, Levitan R, Gonzalez A, et al. DRD2 and SLC6A3 moderate impact of maternal depressive symptoms on infant cortisol. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015;62:243-51.
Ludmer, J. A., Levitan, R., Gonzalez, A., Kennedy, J., Villani, V., Masellis, M., Basile, V. S., & Atkinson, L. (2015). DRD2 and SLC6A3 moderate impact of maternal depressive symptoms on infant cortisol. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 62, 243-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2015.08.026
Ludmer JA, et al. DRD2 and SLC6A3 Moderate Impact of Maternal Depressive Symptoms On Infant Cortisol. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2015;62:243-51. PubMed PMID: 26342565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - DRD2 and SLC6A3 moderate impact of maternal depressive symptoms on infant cortisol. AU - Ludmer,Jaclyn A, AU - Levitan,Robert, AU - Gonzalez,Andrea, AU - Kennedy,James, AU - Villani,Vanessa, AU - Masellis,Mario, AU - Basile,Vincenzo S, AU - Atkinson,Leslie, Y1 - 2015/09/04/ PY - 2015/05/16/received PY - 2015/08/25/revised PY - 2015/08/26/accepted PY - 2015/9/7/entrez PY - 2015/9/8/pubmed PY - 2016/8/19/medline KW - Cortisol KW - DRD2 KW - Infant KW - Maternal depressive symptoms KW - SLC6A3 KW - Strange situation SP - 243 EP - 51 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 62 N2 - Both maternal depressive symptoms and infants' dopamine-related genetic characteristics have been linked to infants' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) functioning. This study investigated the interactive influence of maternal depressive symptoms and infant DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes on infant cortisol reactivity; whether this interaction reflects diathesis-stress or differential susceptibility; and whether this interaction influences the flexibility of the infant cortisol response across challenges known to exert differential effects on infant cortisol reactivity. A community sample of 314 mother-infant dyads participated in toy frustration (age 16 months) and maternal separation (age 17 months) challenges, and salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, +20, and +40min. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory-II at infant age 16 months. Infant buccal cells were collected at both time points for genotyping. DRD2 and SLC6A3 genotypes moderated the relation between maternal depressive symptomatology and infant cortisol reactivity in a diathesis-stress manner in the context of toy frustration, and in a differential susceptibility manner in the context of maternal separation. Higher levels of maternal depressive symptoms predicted reduced cortisol flexibility across challenges for infants with at least one A1 allele of DRD2 and infants with the 10/10 genotype of SLC6A3. Results suggest that maternal depressive symptomatology is related to infants' cortisol reactivity and to the flexibility of that reactivity across psychosocial challenges, but this relation is dependent on the infant's genetic characteristics. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26342565/DRD2_and_SLC6A3_moderate_impact_of_maternal_depressive_symptoms_on_infant_cortisol_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(15)00899-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -