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How may a shift towards a more sustainable food consumption pattern affect nutrient intakes of Dutch children?
Public Health Nutr 2015; 18(13):2468-78PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Food has a considerable environmental impact. Diets with less meat and dairy reduce environmental impact but may pose nutritional challenges for children. The current modelling study investigates the impact of diets with less or no meat and dairy products on nutrient intakes.

DESIGN

Energy and nutrient intakes were assessed for observed consumption patterns (reference) and two replacement scenarios with data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey - Young Children (2005-2006). In the replacement scenarios, 30 % or 100 % of the consumed dairy and meat (in grams) was replaced by plant-derived foods with similar use.

SETTING

The Netherlands.

SUBJECTS

Children (n 1279) aged 2-6 years.

RESULTS

Partial and full replacement of meat and dairy foods by plant-derived foods reduced SFA intake by 9 % and 26 %, respectively, while fibre intake was 8 % and 29 % higher. With partial replacement, micronutrient intakes were similar, except for lower vitamin B12 intake. After full meat and dairy replacement, mean intakes of Ca, Zn and thiamin decreased by 5-13 %, and vitamin B12 intake by 49 %, while total intake of Fe was higher but of lower bioavailability. With full replacement, the proportion of girls aged 4-6 years with intakes below recommendations was 15 % for thiamin, 10 % for vitamin B12 and 6 % for Zn.

CONCLUSIONS

Partial replacement of meat and dairy by plant-derived foods is beneficial for children's health by lowering SFA intake, increasing fibre content and maintaining similar micronutrient intakes. When full replacements are made, attention is recommended to ensure adequate thiamin, vitamin B12 and Zn intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM),PO Box 1,3720 BA Bilthoven,The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26344035

Citation

Temme, Elisabeth H M., et al. "How May a Shift Towards a More Sustainable Food Consumption Pattern Affect Nutrient Intakes of Dutch Children?" Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 13, 2015, pp. 2468-78.
Temme EH, Bakker HM, Seves SM, et al. How may a shift towards a more sustainable food consumption pattern affect nutrient intakes of Dutch children? Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(13):2468-78.
Temme, E. H., Bakker, H. M., Seves, S. M., Verkaik-Kloosterman, J., Dekkers, A. L., van Raaij, J. M., & Ocké, M. C. (2015). How may a shift towards a more sustainable food consumption pattern affect nutrient intakes of Dutch children? Public Health Nutrition, 18(13), pp. 2468-78. doi:10.1017/S1368980015002426.
Temme EH, et al. How May a Shift Towards a More Sustainable Food Consumption Pattern Affect Nutrient Intakes of Dutch Children. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(13):2468-78. PubMed PMID: 26344035.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How may a shift towards a more sustainable food consumption pattern affect nutrient intakes of Dutch children? AU - Temme,Elisabeth H M, AU - Bakker,Helena M E, AU - Seves,S Marije, AU - Verkaik-Kloosterman,Janneke, AU - Dekkers,Arnold L, AU - van Raaij,Joop M A, AU - Ocké,Marga C, PY - 2015/9/8/entrez PY - 2015/9/8/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - Children KW - Food consumption KW - Health KW - Nutrient intake KW - Sustainability SP - 2468 EP - 78 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 18 IS - 13 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Food has a considerable environmental impact. Diets with less meat and dairy reduce environmental impact but may pose nutritional challenges for children. The current modelling study investigates the impact of diets with less or no meat and dairy products on nutrient intakes. DESIGN: Energy and nutrient intakes were assessed for observed consumption patterns (reference) and two replacement scenarios with data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey - Young Children (2005-2006). In the replacement scenarios, 30 % or 100 % of the consumed dairy and meat (in grams) was replaced by plant-derived foods with similar use. SETTING: The Netherlands. SUBJECTS: Children (n 1279) aged 2-6 years. RESULTS: Partial and full replacement of meat and dairy foods by plant-derived foods reduced SFA intake by 9 % and 26 %, respectively, while fibre intake was 8 % and 29 % higher. With partial replacement, micronutrient intakes were similar, except for lower vitamin B12 intake. After full meat and dairy replacement, mean intakes of Ca, Zn and thiamin decreased by 5-13 %, and vitamin B12 intake by 49 %, while total intake of Fe was higher but of lower bioavailability. With full replacement, the proportion of girls aged 4-6 years with intakes below recommendations was 15 % for thiamin, 10 % for vitamin B12 and 6 % for Zn. CONCLUSIONS: Partial replacement of meat and dairy by plant-derived foods is beneficial for children's health by lowering SFA intake, increasing fibre content and maintaining similar micronutrient intakes. When full replacements are made, attention is recommended to ensure adequate thiamin, vitamin B12 and Zn intakes. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26344035/How_may_a_shift_towards_a_more_sustainable_food_consumption_pattern_affect_nutrient_intakes_of_Dutch_children L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980015002426/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -