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Prospective associations between a dietary index based on the British Food Standard Agency nutrient profiling system and 13-year weight gain in the SU.VI.MAX cohort.
Prev Med. 2015 Dec; 81:189-94.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

The scoring of the nutritional quality of individual foods using nutrient profiling systems (NPS) has been suggested as a basis for public health preventive measures. Used for front-of-package labeling, such scoring would help consumers in making healthier food choices. An individual dietary score based on the Food Standards Agency NPS has been developed (FSA-NPS-DI), but its long term association with weight gain has not been investigated. Our objectives were to investigate long-term associations between the FSA-NPS DI and weight gain and overweight/obesity onset in a middle-aged French population.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

Subjects included in the French SU.VI.MAX cohort with at least three dietary records at baseline and available anthropometric measurements at baseline and at a 13-year follow-up examination were included in the study. FSA-NPS DI at baseline was computed for each subject. Association between FSA-NPS DI and weight and BMI gain were investigated with ANCOVA and associations with overweight/obesity onset with logistic regression models.

RESULTS

Higher baseline FSA-NPS DI (reflecting a poorer diet) was associated with higher weight and BMI gain (beta Q4 versus Q1=0.70; (95%CI 0.01; 1.38), P for trend=0.04). A 16% higher risk of obesity for a 1 point increase of FSA-NPS DI was observed only in men.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that a shift in nutritional quality of the foods and beverages within an individual's diet, as expressed by the FSA-NPS DI would be associated with lower weight gain in the long term. Using the FSA-NPS as a basis for food labeling might therefore contribute to tackle obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France; Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne (AP-HP), F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France; Département de Santé Publique, Hôpital Avicenne (AP-HP), F-93017 Bobigny, France.Université Paris 13, Equipe de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle (EREN), Centre de Recherche en Epidémiologie et Statistiques, Inserm (U11530, Inra(U1125), Cnam, COMUE Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, F-93017 Bobigny, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26348449

Citation

Julia, Chantal, et al. "Prospective Associations Between a Dietary Index Based On the British Food Standard Agency Nutrient Profiling System and 13-year Weight Gain in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort." Preventive Medicine, vol. 81, 2015, pp. 189-94.
Julia C, Ducrot P, Lassale C, et al. Prospective associations between a dietary index based on the British Food Standard Agency nutrient profiling system and 13-year weight gain in the SU.VI.MAX cohort. Prev Med. 2015;81:189-94.
Julia, C., Ducrot, P., Lassale, C., Fézeu, L., Méjean, C., Péneau, S., Touvier, M., Hercberg, S., & Kesse-Guyot, E. (2015). Prospective associations between a dietary index based on the British Food Standard Agency nutrient profiling system and 13-year weight gain in the SU.VI.MAX cohort. Preventive Medicine, 81, 189-94. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.08.022
Julia C, et al. Prospective Associations Between a Dietary Index Based On the British Food Standard Agency Nutrient Profiling System and 13-year Weight Gain in the SU.VI.MAX Cohort. Prev Med. 2015;81:189-94. PubMed PMID: 26348449.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective associations between a dietary index based on the British Food Standard Agency nutrient profiling system and 13-year weight gain in the SU.VI.MAX cohort. AU - Julia,Chantal, AU - Ducrot,Pauline, AU - Lassale,Camille, AU - Fézeu,Léopold, AU - Méjean,Caroline, AU - Péneau,Sandrine, AU - Touvier,Mathilde, AU - Hercberg,Serge, AU - Kesse-Guyot,Emmanuelle, Y1 - 2015/09/05/ PY - 2015/02/17/received PY - 2015/08/26/revised PY - 2015/08/31/accepted PY - 2015/9/9/entrez PY - 2015/9/9/pubmed PY - 2016/8/2/medline KW - Cohort study KW - Dietary score KW - Nutrient profiling systems KW - Obesity KW - Weight gain SP - 189 EP - 94 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 81 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The scoring of the nutritional quality of individual foods using nutrient profiling systems (NPS) has been suggested as a basis for public health preventive measures. Used for front-of-package labeling, such scoring would help consumers in making healthier food choices. An individual dietary score based on the Food Standards Agency NPS has been developed (FSA-NPS-DI), but its long term association with weight gain has not been investigated. Our objectives were to investigate long-term associations between the FSA-NPS DI and weight gain and overweight/obesity onset in a middle-aged French population. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Subjects included in the French SU.VI.MAX cohort with at least three dietary records at baseline and available anthropometric measurements at baseline and at a 13-year follow-up examination were included in the study. FSA-NPS DI at baseline was computed for each subject. Association between FSA-NPS DI and weight and BMI gain were investigated with ANCOVA and associations with overweight/obesity onset with logistic regression models. RESULTS: Higher baseline FSA-NPS DI (reflecting a poorer diet) was associated with higher weight and BMI gain (beta Q4 versus Q1=0.70; (95%CI 0.01; 1.38), P for trend=0.04). A 16% higher risk of obesity for a 1 point increase of FSA-NPS DI was observed only in men. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a shift in nutritional quality of the foods and beverages within an individual's diet, as expressed by the FSA-NPS DI would be associated with lower weight gain in the long term. Using the FSA-NPS as a basis for food labeling might therefore contribute to tackle obesity. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26348449/Prospective_associations_between_a_dietary_index_based_on_the_British_Food_Standard_Agency_nutrient_profiling_system_and_13_year_weight_gain_in_the_SU_VI_MAX_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(15)00274-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -