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Development of an experimental apparatus and protocol for determining antimicrobial activities of gaseous plant essential oils.
Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Dec 23; 215:95-100.IJ

Abstract

There is a growing interest in the use of naturally-occurring antimicrobial agents such as plant essential oils (EOs) to inhibit the growth of hazardous and spoilage microorganisms in foods. Gaseous EOs (EO gases) have many potential applications in the food industry, including use as antimicrobial agents in food packaging materials and sanitizing agents for foods and food-contact surfaces, and in food processing environments. Despite the potentially beneficial applications of EO gases, there is no standard method to evaluate their antimicrobial activities. Thus, the present study was aimed at developing an experimental apparatus and protocol to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of EO gases against microorganisms. A sealed experimental apparatus was constructed for simultaneous evaluation of antimicrobial activities of EO gases at different concentrations without creating concentration gradients. A differential medium was then evaluated in which a color change allowed for the determination of growth of glucose-fermenting microorganisms. Lastly, an experimental protocol for the assessment of MIC and MLC values of EO gases was developed, and these values were determined for 31 EO gases against Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. Results showed that cinnamon bark EO gas had the lowest MIC (0.0391 μl/ml), followed by thyme-thymol EO gas (0.0781 μl/ml), oregano EO gas (0.3125 μl/ml), peppermint EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml), and thyme-linalool EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml). The order of the MLC values of the EO gases against the E. coli O157:H7 was thyme-thymol (0.0781 μl/ml)<cinnamon bark (0.1563 μl/ml)<oregano (0.3125 μl/ml)<peppermint (0.6250 μl/ml)=thyme-linalool (0.6250 μl/ml). The experimental apparatus and protocol enable rapid and accurate determination of the MIC and MLC values of EO gases and perhaps other types of gaseous antimicrobial agents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea.Center for Food Safety and Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Georgia, 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, GA 30223-1797, USA.Department of Food and Nutrition, Wonkwang University, Shinyong-dong, Iksan, Jeonbuk 570-749, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: hoihyung@wku.ac.kr.Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: escheri@korea.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26350124

Citation

Seo, Hyun-Sun, et al. "Development of an Experimental Apparatus and Protocol for Determining Antimicrobial Activities of Gaseous Plant Essential Oils." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 215, 2015, pp. 95-100.
Seo HS, Beuchat LR, Kim H, et al. Development of an experimental apparatus and protocol for determining antimicrobial activities of gaseous plant essential oils. Int J Food Microbiol. 2015;215:95-100.
Seo, H. S., Beuchat, L. R., Kim, H., & Ryu, J. H. (2015). Development of an experimental apparatus and protocol for determining antimicrobial activities of gaseous plant essential oils. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 215, 95-100. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2015.08.021
Seo HS, et al. Development of an Experimental Apparatus and Protocol for Determining Antimicrobial Activities of Gaseous Plant Essential Oils. Int J Food Microbiol. 2015 Dec 23;215:95-100. PubMed PMID: 26350124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Development of an experimental apparatus and protocol for determining antimicrobial activities of gaseous plant essential oils. AU - Seo,Hyun-Sun, AU - Beuchat,Larry R, AU - Kim,Hoikyung, AU - Ryu,Jee-Hoon, Y1 - 2015/09/02/ PY - 2015/05/19/received PY - 2015/08/20/revised PY - 2015/08/27/accepted PY - 2015/9/10/entrez PY - 2015/9/10/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - Antimicrobial KW - Escherichia coli O157:H7 KW - Gaseous essential oils KW - Minimal inhibitory concentration KW - Minimal lethal concentration SP - 95 EP - 100 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int J Food Microbiol VL - 215 N2 - There is a growing interest in the use of naturally-occurring antimicrobial agents such as plant essential oils (EOs) to inhibit the growth of hazardous and spoilage microorganisms in foods. Gaseous EOs (EO gases) have many potential applications in the food industry, including use as antimicrobial agents in food packaging materials and sanitizing agents for foods and food-contact surfaces, and in food processing environments. Despite the potentially beneficial applications of EO gases, there is no standard method to evaluate their antimicrobial activities. Thus, the present study was aimed at developing an experimental apparatus and protocol to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of EO gases against microorganisms. A sealed experimental apparatus was constructed for simultaneous evaluation of antimicrobial activities of EO gases at different concentrations without creating concentration gradients. A differential medium was then evaluated in which a color change allowed for the determination of growth of glucose-fermenting microorganisms. Lastly, an experimental protocol for the assessment of MIC and MLC values of EO gases was developed, and these values were determined for 31 EO gases against Escherichia coli O157:H7 as a model bacterium. Results showed that cinnamon bark EO gas had the lowest MIC (0.0391 μl/ml), followed by thyme-thymol EO gas (0.0781 μl/ml), oregano EO gas (0.3125 μl/ml), peppermint EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml), and thyme-linalool EO gas (0.6250 μl/ml). The order of the MLC values of the EO gases against the E. coli O157:H7 was thyme-thymol (0.0781 μl/ml)<cinnamon bark (0.1563 μl/ml)<oregano (0.3125 μl/ml)<peppermint (0.6250 μl/ml)=thyme-linalool (0.6250 μl/ml). The experimental apparatus and protocol enable rapid and accurate determination of the MIC and MLC values of EO gases and perhaps other types of gaseous antimicrobial agents. SN - 1879-3460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26350124/Development_of_an_experimental_apparatus_and_protocol_for_determining_antimicrobial_activities_of_gaseous_plant_essential_oils_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -