Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) IN AN ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS).
J Zoo Wildl Med. 2015 Sep; 46(3):605-8.JZ

Abstract

A 9-yr-old castrated male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) presented with lethargy and partial anorexia. A diagnostic examination revealed fever, and further workup revealed a neutrophilia, hyperfibrinogenemia, renal azotemia, and a rapid onset of a high Leptospira antibody titer during the acute clinical period (Grippotyphosa serovar). The camel responded clinically to antimicrobial treatment with ceftiofur crystalline free acid injections, but renal azotemia persisted, presumably secondary to chronic renal damage. Subsequent Leptospira polymerase chain reaction testing on urine samples obtained over the following 4 mo revealed no evidence of urinary shedding, so a persistent infection was unlikely. Although often mentioned as a potential cause of reproductive loss, well-documented case reports of clinical leptospirosis in camelids are very rare. In this case, native wildlife contamination of a small watering hole is suspected to have been the source of infection. In response to this experience, the camel and two conspecifics were prescribed a vaccination regimen using an inactivated pentavalent Leptospira vaccine licensed for cattle.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26352970

Citation

Gyimesi, Zoltan S., et al. "ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) in an ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS)." Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine : Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, vol. 46, no. 3, 2015, pp. 605-8.
Gyimesi ZS, Burns RB, Erol E, et al. ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) IN AN ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2015;46(3):605-8.
Gyimesi, Z. S., Burns, R. B., Erol, E., & Bolin, S. R. (2015). ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) IN AN ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine : Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, 46(3), 605-8. https://doi.org/10.1638/2014-0186.1
Gyimesi ZS, et al. ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) in an ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS). J Zoo Wildl Med. 2015;46(3):605-8. PubMed PMID: 26352970.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - ACUTE CLINICAL LEPTOSPIROSIS (GRIPPOTYPHOSA SEROVAR) IN AN ADULT DROMEDARY CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS). AU - Gyimesi,Zoltan S, AU - Burns,Roy B, AU - Erol,Erdal, AU - Bolin,Steven R, PY - 2015/9/10/entrez PY - 2015/9/10/pubmed PY - 2015/10/31/medline KW - Camel KW - Camelus dromedarius KW - Grippotyphosa KW - Leptospira KW - ceftiofur crystalline free acid KW - leptospirosis SP - 605 EP - 8 JF - Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians JO - J. Zoo Wildl. Med. VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - A 9-yr-old castrated male dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius) presented with lethargy and partial anorexia. A diagnostic examination revealed fever, and further workup revealed a neutrophilia, hyperfibrinogenemia, renal azotemia, and a rapid onset of a high Leptospira antibody titer during the acute clinical period (Grippotyphosa serovar). The camel responded clinically to antimicrobial treatment with ceftiofur crystalline free acid injections, but renal azotemia persisted, presumably secondary to chronic renal damage. Subsequent Leptospira polymerase chain reaction testing on urine samples obtained over the following 4 mo revealed no evidence of urinary shedding, so a persistent infection was unlikely. Although often mentioned as a potential cause of reproductive loss, well-documented case reports of clinical leptospirosis in camelids are very rare. In this case, native wildlife contamination of a small watering hole is suspected to have been the source of infection. In response to this experience, the camel and two conspecifics were prescribed a vaccination regimen using an inactivated pentavalent Leptospira vaccine licensed for cattle. SN - 1042-7260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26352970/ACUTE_CLINICAL_LEPTOSPIROSIS__GRIPPOTYPHOSA_SEROVAR__IN_AN_ADULT_DROMEDARY_CAMEL__CAMELUS_DROMEDARIUS__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1638/2014-0186.1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -