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Vaccines to prevent pneumonia in children - a developing country perspective.
Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017 Mar; 22:23-30.PR

Abstract

Pneumonia accounted for 15% of the 6.3 million deaths among children younger than five years in 2013, a total of approximately 935,000 deaths worldwide. Routine vaccination against common childhood illnesses has been identified as one of the most cost-effective strategies to prevent death from pneumonia. Vaccine-preventable or potentially preventable diseases commonly linked with respiratory tract infections include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza type-b (Hib), pertussis, influenza, measles, and tuberculosis. Although here have been great strides in the development and administration of effective vaccines, the countries that carry the largest disease burdens still struggle to vaccinate their children and newer conjugated vaccines remain out of reach for many. The Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) has identified priority areas for innovation in research in all aspects of immunisation development and delivery to ensure equitable access to vaccines for all.

Authors+Show Affiliations

KEMRI Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Department of Public Health Research, Health Services Unit, Nairobi, Kenya. Electronic address: joliwa@kemri-wellcome.org.Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity and The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26364006

Citation

Oliwa, Jacquie N., and Ben J. Marais. "Vaccines to Prevent Pneumonia in Children - a Developing Country Perspective." Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, vol. 22, 2017, pp. 23-30.
Oliwa JN, Marais BJ. Vaccines to prevent pneumonia in children - a developing country perspective. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017;22:23-30.
Oliwa, J. N., & Marais, B. J. (2017). Vaccines to prevent pneumonia in children - a developing country perspective. Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, 22, 23-30. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.prrv.2015.08.004
Oliwa JN, Marais BJ. Vaccines to Prevent Pneumonia in Children - a Developing Country Perspective. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2017;22:23-30. PubMed PMID: 26364006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vaccines to prevent pneumonia in children - a developing country perspective. AU - Oliwa,Jacquie N, AU - Marais,Ben J, Y1 - 2015/08/19/ PY - 2015/08/12/received PY - 2015/08/12/accepted PY - 2015/9/14/pubmed PY - 2017/10/12/medline PY - 2015/9/14/entrez KW - Children KW - Developing countries KW - Pneumonia KW - Vaccines SP - 23 EP - 30 JF - Paediatric respiratory reviews JO - Paediatr Respir Rev VL - 22 N2 - Pneumonia accounted for 15% of the 6.3 million deaths among children younger than five years in 2013, a total of approximately 935,000 deaths worldwide. Routine vaccination against common childhood illnesses has been identified as one of the most cost-effective strategies to prevent death from pneumonia. Vaccine-preventable or potentially preventable diseases commonly linked with respiratory tract infections include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenza type-b (Hib), pertussis, influenza, measles, and tuberculosis. Although here have been great strides in the development and administration of effective vaccines, the countries that carry the largest disease burdens still struggle to vaccinate their children and newer conjugated vaccines remain out of reach for many. The Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP) has identified priority areas for innovation in research in all aspects of immunisation development and delivery to ensure equitable access to vaccines for all. SN - 1526-0550 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26364006/Vaccines_to_prevent_pneumonia_in_children___a_developing_country_perspective_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1526-0542(15)00075-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -