Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study of buccal plate thickness of the maxillary and mandibular posterior dentition.
Clin Oral Implants Res 2016; 27(9):1072-8CO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Buccal plate thickness is of clinical importance in treatment planning for implants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the buccal plate thickness in posterior dentate areas of both the maxilla and mandible using cone beam computed tomography in order to estimate the approximate distributions of this anatomic variable.

METHODS

Two hundred and sixty-five subjects were included for a total of nine hundred and thirty-four roots assessed by cone beam computed tomography. CBCT scans were taken and evaluated at the ideal buccolingual cross-sections of each root at 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm apical to the alveolar crest to measure buccal plate thickness. Data are reported by geometric means and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS

Both arches demonstrated increasing buccal plate thickness from anterior to posterior. Maxillary teeth had a significant decrease in thickness from coronal to apical along the tooth root (P < 0.001), except at second molars. The first premolar and mesial root of the first molar were significantly thinner than all other roots in the maxilla. Conversely, the mandible demonstrated a significant increase in buccal plate thickness from coronal to apical (P < 0.001). The premolars were significantly thinner than all other roots. Age and sex were found to have limited impact on buccal plate thickness in both arches.

CONCLUSIONS

Buccal plate thickness is highly dependent upon the arch position, tooth location, and measurement point, but age and sex have limited impact.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Private Practice, Tyler, TX, USA.Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

26364803

Citation

Temple, Kayleigh E., et al. "A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Study of Buccal Plate Thickness of the Maxillary and Mandibular Posterior Dentition." Clinical Oral Implants Research, vol. 27, no. 9, 2016, pp. 1072-8.
Temple KE, Schoolfield J, Noujeim ME, et al. A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study of buccal plate thickness of the maxillary and mandibular posterior dentition. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2016;27(9):1072-8.
Temple, K. E., Schoolfield, J., Noujeim, M. E., Huynh-Ba, G., Lasho, D. J., & Mealey, B. L. (2016). A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study of buccal plate thickness of the maxillary and mandibular posterior dentition. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 27(9), pp. 1072-8. doi:10.1111/clr.12688.
Temple KE, et al. A Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Study of Buccal Plate Thickness of the Maxillary and Mandibular Posterior Dentition. Clin Oral Implants Res. 2016;27(9):1072-8. PubMed PMID: 26364803.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study of buccal plate thickness of the maxillary and mandibular posterior dentition. AU - Temple,Kayleigh E, AU - Schoolfield,John, AU - Noujeim,Marcel E, AU - Huynh-Ba,Guy, AU - Lasho,David J, AU - Mealey,Brian L, Y1 - 2015/09/14/ PY - 2015/07/28/accepted PY - 2015/9/15/entrez PY - 2015/9/15/pubmed PY - 2017/10/13/medline KW - anatomy KW - cone beam computed tomography KW - dental implant KW - mandible KW - maxilla KW - tooth extraction SP - 1072 EP - 8 JF - Clinical oral implants research JO - Clin Oral Implants Res VL - 27 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Buccal plate thickness is of clinical importance in treatment planning for implants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the buccal plate thickness in posterior dentate areas of both the maxilla and mandible using cone beam computed tomography in order to estimate the approximate distributions of this anatomic variable. METHODS: Two hundred and sixty-five subjects were included for a total of nine hundred and thirty-four roots assessed by cone beam computed tomography. CBCT scans were taken and evaluated at the ideal buccolingual cross-sections of each root at 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm apical to the alveolar crest to measure buccal plate thickness. Data are reported by geometric means and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Both arches demonstrated increasing buccal plate thickness from anterior to posterior. Maxillary teeth had a significant decrease in thickness from coronal to apical along the tooth root (P < 0.001), except at second molars. The first premolar and mesial root of the first molar were significantly thinner than all other roots in the maxilla. Conversely, the mandible demonstrated a significant increase in buccal plate thickness from coronal to apical (P < 0.001). The premolars were significantly thinner than all other roots. Age and sex were found to have limited impact on buccal plate thickness in both arches. CONCLUSIONS: Buccal plate thickness is highly dependent upon the arch position, tooth location, and measurement point, but age and sex have limited impact. SN - 1600-0501 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/26364803/A_cone_beam_computed_tomography__CBCT__study_of_buccal_plate_thickness_of_the_maxillary_and_mandibular_posterior_dentition_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.12688 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -